Sunday’s Obituary – Elizabeth (Schwartz) Yegerlehner

Yegerlehner, Elizabeth - Obituary, 1922

MRS. ELIZABETH YEAGERLEHNER

By Special Correspondent.

CLAY CITY, Ind., June 13 – Mrs. Elizabeth Yeagerlehner, 79 years old, died at the home of her son, John Yeagerlehner, in Clay City. She is survived by four sons and two daughters, George F., of Indianapolis; William, of Cando, N.D.; Samuel, of California; John, of Clay City, and Mrs. Sophia Thacker, of Indianapolis. Funeral services will be held at the St. Peter’s Reformed church Thursday, with burial in the cemetery near the church.

Terre Haute Tribune, Tuesday, 13 June 1922, p. 2

Elizabeth (Schwartz) Yegerlehner holding bible

Photograph in the collection of Deborah Sweeney

Elizabeth was the daughter of Niklaus and Elizabeth (Kunz) Schwartz. She was a native of Biglen, Canton Bern, Switzerland. She was the eldest daughter and fourth child of her parents. In 1852, she sailed with her family on the ship Hungarian from Le Havre, France. On arriving in the United States, the family settled near Berlin, Holmes County, Ohio, in a predominately Swiss settled area. She married Christian Yegerlehner on 24 November 1861. Christian was also a Swiss native from Canton Bern, Switzerland. A few years later, they moved further west to Owen County, Indiana. They eventually bought farmland in neighboring Clay County, Indiana (which still remains in the family today). She was the mother of ten children.

Yegerlehner, Christian & Elizabeth (Schwartz) - gravestone

Photograph by Tonya & Keith Tetidrick (2009)

Elizabeth is buried at St. Peter’s Reformed Church cemetery on the Owen/Clay County line.

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/10/20/sundays-obitua…tz-yegerlehner/

2 thoughts on “Sunday’s Obituary – Elizabeth (Schwartz) Yegerlehner

  1. davidmadison1942

    Elizabeth is holding a book. How wonderful. Maybe books were favorite props in photos of the time, but we can indulge in the fantasy that she harbored “the reading gene” (“the curiosity gene”) that she has passed along. 🙂

    Reply

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