A Mystery Solved? (Part 3)

Collateral lines, Locations of Interest, Naming Patterns and DNA (Oh My!)
 
I have previously discussed Bathsheba Laughead and Ruth (Laughead) Coen and their status as persons of interest in my quest to determine the parents of Joseph Laughead. During the last year, another person of interest came to my attention through the use of DNA. One of my matches (at 23andme) is a gentleman named Mr. Glover. The surname Glover sounded familiar to me because I have traced the collateral (or descendant) lines of many branches of the Laughead family. With a few emails back and forth, I knew how we were connected.

Lawhead segment (edited)

Graphic courtesy of 23andme

 

Mr. Glover is a descendant of Susannah (Lawhead) Glover of Greene County, Indiana. On 2 March 1840, Susannah married John D. Glover in Guernsey County, Ohio. Later that year, John Glover lived in Union Township [now defunct], Monroe County, Ohio. His household consisted of: a twenty something male (John), a twenty something female (Susannah), and a female child under the age of 5 (Martha). That same year, Joseph Laughead and his family lived in Somerset Township, Belmont County, Ohio. Somerset Township borders Guernsey County on its western side. By 1850, both families had moved around the tri-county region and had settled in Seneca Township, Guernsey County. Coincidentally, the two families migrated west to Greene County, Indiana by the 1860 census.

Lawhead, Susannah & John Glover - Marriage extraction, 1840

Image courtesy of Family Search

Clearly, the families of Joseph Laughead and Susannah (Lawhead) Glover were connected. The families lived in the same region of Ohio. They migrated further west around the same time, and settled in the same geographic area of Indiana. Another clue that links the families is naming patterns. Different historical time periods, religious groups, ethnic groups, etc. have practiced the tradition of naming children after family members, sometimes in a set pattern. In some cases, a strict pattern was followed. For example, the first born male was named after the child’s paternal grandfather, the second male child was named after the child’s maternal grandfather, and so on. In the case of the family of John and Susannah (Lawhead) Glover, they named their third daughter Bathsheba.

Extracted Information: 

  • The families of Joseph Laughead and John D. Glover lived in the same areas of Ohio and Indiana, AT THE SAME TIME
  • John D. Glover named one of his daughters Bathsheba
  • A descendant of John D. Glover and Susannah (Lawhead) Glover shares DNA segments with several descendants of Joseph Laughead. The relationship is computed to be that of fourth cousins.
  • The ages of Joseph (c1817) and Susannah (1821) are close enough to fall within the same generation.

Conclusion:

Joseph Laughead and Susannah (Lawhead) Grover were siblings. Susannah named one of her daughters Bathsheba after her mother. Most records consistently state that Susannah was born in Ohio. Since Joseph was born in Pennsylvania, it is likely that the family migrated to Ohio between the births of Joseph and Susannah, c1817-1821.

Mr. Laughead & Bathsheba
Susannah Lawhead (1821-1906)m. John D. Glover Joseph Laughead (c1817-1883)m. Cassandra Harding
Charles H. Glover First Cousins James H. Lawhead (1840-1920)
John Glover Second Cousins Emma Lawhead (1872-1943)
John Glover Third Cousins Gladys Foster (1905-1998)m. Roscoe Yegerlehner
Mr. Glover Fourth Cousins David Yegerlehner

Sources:

1840 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Somerset Township, p. 10 (penned), line 14, Joseph Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 378.

1840 U. S. census, Monroe County, Ohio, Union Township, p. 83 (penned), line 19, John Glover; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 416.

1850 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, population schedule, Seneca Township, p. 474 (penned), dwelling 3045, family 3067, Joseph Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 684.

1850 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, population schedule, Seneca Township, p. 373 (stamped), dwelling 3133, family 3155, John Glover; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 684.

1860 U. S. census, Greene County, Indiana, population schedule, Centre Township, p. 75-76 (penned), dwelling 530, family 530, Joseph Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 262.

1860 U. S. census, Greene County, Indiana, population schedule, Beech Creek Township, p. 36 (penned), dwelling 252, family 252, John D. Glover; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 262.

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” database and images, Family Search (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 9 April 2014) John Glover and Susannah Lawhead, 2 March 1840; citing Guernsey County, Marriage records 1832-1848, v. C: 306.

© Deborah Sweeney, 2014.
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2014/04/09/a-mystery-solved-part-3/

5 thoughts on “A Mystery Solved? (Part 3)

  1. davidmadison1942

    Charles H. Glover First Cousins James H. Lawhead (1840-1920)
    John Glover Second Cousins Emma Lawhead (1872-1943)
    John Glover Third Cousins Gladys Foster (1905-1998)m. Roscoe Yegerlehner
    Mr. Glover Fourth Cousins David Yegerlehner

    I presume that the David Yegerlehner is me, but I am curious why the fourth Glover listed is called Mr. Glover instead of John. And is that Mr.Glover still alive?

    Reply
    1. Genealogy Lady Post author

      It is so much fun to use the DNA. I have picked up avenues of research that I would never thought of because someone was a DNA match for me. I just sent away for Susannah’s death certificate because I want to see if her parents are listed. That would be a huge breakthrough for me on this line.

      Reply

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