Tag Archives: Ohio

Lena’s Postcards #30

Postmark:
Cincinnatti, OH, December 4, 19??, 3:30 PM [Most likely between 1920, when Alma still lived in Connersville, and 1926, when Alma married Fred Mundt in Hamilton County, Ohio.]

Addressed to:
Mrs. J. Hackleman
923 Fayette St.
Connersville, Ind.

Message:
Alma Backmeier
Greenwell Ave.
R.R. #4 Box 166
Price Hill, Cin. O.

Dear Friends!

No doubt you thought I had forgotten you, but I assure you I didn’t. I just didn’t get to it. We have a lovely home here. I suppose you are busy getting ready for Xmas. Our Xmas will not be as happy as usual, as we have a vacancy in our home which will never be filled, still we try to make everything as cheerful as we can. Best to Mr. H. With love, Alma


The death Alma referred to was most likely that of her mother, Elizabeth. On the 1930 census, Alma’s father, Charles Backmeier, lived with Alma (and her family). At that point, Charles was a widower. Alma and her family were musicians, as evidenced from the Connersville City Directory in 1915. They were also neighbors of Lena and John Hackleman. The Backmeiers lived at #920 Fayette Street.

Connersville Directory, 1915 - Backmeier

Connersville Directory, 1915 (Image courtesy of Ancestry.com)

©2015 copyright owned by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/04/06/lenas-postcards-30/

 

 

A Mystery Solved? (Part 5)

Now that it has been established that James Laughead was likely the father of Joseph Laughead, the next step is another trip back in time (census-wise) to the 1820 census.

Since Joseph was born in Pennsylvania, circa 1817, and his sisters, Susannah and Ruth, were born in Ohio in 1821 and 1825, searching both states is necessary to establish when the family moved. Five James Laugheads appeared on the 1820 censuses of Ohio and Pennsylvania.

James Laughead Families in Pennsylvania & Ohio 1820
James Laughead Union, Fayette, Pennsylvania
James Laughead Bath, Greene, Ohio
James Laughead Washington, Licking, Ohio
James Laughhead Warren, Belmont, Ohio
James B. Laughead Union, Erie, Pennsylvania

It appears that James Laughead arrived in Belmont County as early as 1820. This is consistent with the births of Joseph (1817) and Susannah (1821). The household consisted of six individuals: one male aged 26-44, two males under the age of 10, one female aged 26-44, and two females under the age of ten.

Other clues this census provides:

  • James was born between the years 1776 and 1794.
  • Bathsheba (or James’ wife) was born between the years 1776 and 1794. This fits with what we know of Bathsheba, born circa 1790.
  • Since all the children were under the age of ten, James and Bathsheba (or James’ wife) were married circa 1810. Bathsheba would have been around 20 years old.
Laughead, James - 1820 Census

Image courtesy of Ancestry.com

The only other Laughead who lived in Belmont County during this census year was William Laughead. William was enumerated directly above James on the census page. This page was not arranged alphabetically, indicating a physical closeness between those enumerated. William’s household consisted of 12 individuals: one male aged 26-44, one male aged 16-25, one male under 10, one female aged 26-44, two females under 10, and 6 “other free persons.”

It is possible that James and William were brothers, and the 16-25 year old male who lived with William was another brother, Elisha. Both men lived in Warren Township, Belmont County for many years. In 1830, Elisha Laughead first appeared as a head of household in neighboring Guernsey County. Likely this same Elisha was the man who married Nancy Cowen in Guernsey County, Ohio on 10 May 1821.

Elisha was a name that was used often in the family of Joseph Lawhead. He named his first born son Elisha, and the name was used into the next generation. When the search for Joseph’s parents was begun, an assumption was made that perhaps Joseph’s first born son was named after his grandfather “Elisha” Lawhead. However, that does not appear to be the case as James Laughead is now the most likely candidate. Joseph did name his second son James.

Conclusion:

James Laughead moved to Ohio from Pennsylvania between the years 1817 and 1820. By 1820, he was the father of at least four children, all under the age of 10, including Joseph (1817). James had at least two brothers, William and Elisha.

Sources:

1820 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Warren Township, population schedule, p. 272 (penned), line 5, James Laughhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M33, roll 86.

1820 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Warren Township, population schedule, p. 272 (penned), line 4, William Laughhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M33, roll 86.

1830 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, Richland Township, p. 436 (penned), line 7, Elisha Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M19, roll 131.

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1944,” database & images, Family Search (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 April 2014), Elisha Lawhead and Nancy Cowen, 10 May 1821: citing Guernsey Marriage records 1810-1840, v. A: 48.

© Deborah Sweeney, 2014.
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2014/04/18/a-mystery-solved-part-5/

A Mystery Solved? (Part 4)

Once a time frame was established for the Laughead family settling in Ohio, the next step was to examine some early Ohio records, starting with the census.

To recap the research thus far…

Three likely Laughead/Lawhead siblings are:

Joseph, born Pennsylvania circa 1817
Susannah, born Ohio circa 1821
Ruth, born Ohio circa 1825

Since all three (Joseph, Susannah, and Ruth) were married in the Belmont and Guernsey County area in the late 1830s – early 1840s, further research should focus on these and surrounding counties. Likely mother Bathsheba Laughead  lived in Guernsey County in 1840. Jumping back ten years to the 1830 census, there were 13 Laughead/Lawhead families living in Ohio.

1830 Census of Ohio – Lawhead & Laughead
Name Location
Edward Laughead White Eyes, Coshocton, Ohio
Elisha Lawhead Richland, Guernsey, Ohio
James Laughead Miami, Green, Ohio
James Lawhead Warren, Belmont, Ohio
James Lawhead Camp Creek, Pike, Ohio
John Laughead Union, Clinton, Ohio
Joseph Lawhead Greenfield, Highland, Ohio
Thomas Lawhead Buckskin, Ross, Ohio
William Lawhead McArthur, Logan, Ohio
William Lawhead Warren, Belmont, Ohio
William Lawhead Sugar Creek, Wayne, Ohio
William Lawhead Wayne, Muskingum, Ohio
William Laughead Hopewell, Muskingum, Ohio

Only three of these families lived in the Belmont or Guernsey County area.

The Three Families:

The household of Elisha Lawhead of Guernsey County consisted of seven individual members: one male aged 30-39, two males under 5, two females aged 20-29, and two females aged 5-9. Even though Ruth and Susannah would fit into this family, neither Joseph nor Bathsheba would. Joseph was 13 in 1830 and Bathsheba was 40.

The household of James Lawhead of Belmont County consisted of ten individual members: one male aged 40-49, one male aged 15-20, one male aged 10-14, one male aged 5-9, one female aged 40-49, one female aged 20-29, one female aged 10-14, one female aged 5-9, and two females under 5. Bathsheba (40-49), Joseph (10-14), Susannah (5-9) and Ruth (under 5) would all fit in this family.

Lawhead, James - 1830 census detail

Image courtesy of Ancestry.com

The household of William Lawhead of Belmont County consisted of four individual members: one male aged 40-49, one male aged 15-19, one female aged 40-49, and one female aged 10-14. Bathsheba would fit as the older female, but none of the children match.

In 1840, there were four Laughead/Lawhead families still living in the area:

Bathsheba Laughead (a widow)
Joseph Laughead (now married and head of his own household)
Elisha Laughead (likely the same man from 1830, now ten years older with five children)
James Laughead (not the same man from 1830, a twenty something male, with a wife and two young children)

Conclusion:

The most likely candidate for the father of Joseph, Susannah and Ruth Lawhead was James Lawhead. The family of James and Bathsheba Lawhead had seven or eight children in 1830 so there are more children that need to be identified.

Sources:

1830 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, Richland Township, p. 436 (penned), line 7, Elisha Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M19, roll 131.

1830 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Warren Township, p. 212 (penned), line 4, James Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M19, roll 127.

1830 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Warren Township, p. 216 (penned), line2 4, William Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M19, roll 127.

1840 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Somerset Township, p. 10 (penned), line 14, Joseph Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 378.

1840 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, Seneca Township, p. 3 (penned), line 15, Bathsheba Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 397.

1840 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, Seneca Township, p. 4 (penned), line 7, Elisha Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 397.

1840 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, Seneca Township, p. 4 (penned), line 10, James Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 397.

A Mystery Solved? (Part 3)

Collateral lines, Locations of Interest, Naming Patterns and DNA (Oh My!)
 
I have previously discussed Bathsheba Laughead and Ruth (Laughead) Coen and their status as persons of interest in my quest to determine the parents of Joseph Laughead. During the last year, another person of interest came to my attention through the use of DNA. One of my matches (at 23andme) is a gentleman named Mr. Glover. The surname Glover sounded familiar to me because I have traced the collateral (or descendant) lines of many branches of the Laughead family. With a few emails back and forth, I knew how we were connected.

Lawhead segment (edited)

Graphic courtesy of 23andme

 

Mr. Glover is a descendant of Susannah (Lawhead) Glover of Greene County, Indiana. On 2 March 1840, Susannah married John D. Glover in Guernsey County, Ohio. Later that year, John Glover lived in Union Township [now defunct], Monroe County, Ohio. His household consisted of: a twenty something male (John), a twenty something female (Susannah), and a female child under the age of 5 (Martha). That same year, Joseph Laughead and his family lived in Somerset Township, Belmont County, Ohio. Somerset Township borders Guernsey County on its western side. By 1850, both families had moved around the tri-county region and had settled in Seneca Township, Guernsey County. Coincidentally, the two families migrated west to Greene County, Indiana by the 1860 census.

Lawhead, Susannah & John Glover - Marriage extraction, 1840

Image courtesy of Family Search

Clearly, the families of Joseph Laughead and Susannah (Lawhead) Glover were connected. The families lived in the same region of Ohio. They migrated further west around the same time, and settled in the same geographic area of Indiana. Another clue that links the families is naming patterns. Different historical time periods, religious groups, ethnic groups, etc. have practiced the tradition of naming children after family members, sometimes in a set pattern. In some cases, a strict pattern was followed. For example, the first born male was named after the child’s paternal grandfather, the second male child was named after the child’s maternal grandfather, and so on. In the case of the family of John and Susannah (Lawhead) Glover, they named their third daughter Bathsheba.

Extracted Information: 

  • The families of Joseph Laughead and John D. Glover lived in the same areas of Ohio and Indiana, AT THE SAME TIME
  • John D. Glover named one of his daughters Bathsheba
  • A descendant of John D. Glover and Susannah (Lawhead) Glover shares DNA segments with several descendants of Joseph Laughead. The relationship is computed to be that of fourth cousins.
  • The ages of Joseph (c1817) and Susannah (1821) are close enough to fall within the same generation.

Conclusion:

Joseph Laughead and Susannah (Lawhead) Grover were siblings. Susannah named one of her daughters Bathsheba after her mother. Most records consistently state that Susannah was born in Ohio. Since Joseph was born in Pennsylvania, it is likely that the family migrated to Ohio between the births of Joseph and Susannah, c1817-1821.

Mr. Laughead & Bathsheba
Susannah Lawhead (1821-1906)m. John D. Glover Joseph Laughead (c1817-1883)m. Cassandra Harding
Charles H. Glover First Cousins James H. Lawhead (1840-1920)
John Glover Second Cousins Emma Lawhead (1872-1943)
John Glover Third Cousins Gladys Foster (1905-1998)m. Roscoe Yegerlehner
Mr. Glover Fourth Cousins David Yegerlehner

Sources:

1840 U. S. census, Belmont County, Ohio, Somerset Township, p. 10 (penned), line 14, Joseph Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 378.

1840 U. S. census, Monroe County, Ohio, Union Township, p. 83 (penned), line 19, John Glover; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 416.

1850 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, population schedule, Seneca Township, p. 474 (penned), dwelling 3045, family 3067, Joseph Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 684.

1850 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, population schedule, Seneca Township, p. 373 (stamped), dwelling 3133, family 3155, John Glover; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 684.

1860 U. S. census, Greene County, Indiana, population schedule, Centre Township, p. 75-76 (penned), dwelling 530, family 530, Joseph Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 262.

1860 U. S. census, Greene County, Indiana, population schedule, Beech Creek Township, p. 36 (penned), dwelling 252, family 252, John D. Glover; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 262.

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” database and images, Family Search (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 9 April 2014) John Glover and Susannah Lawhead, 2 March 1840; citing Guernsey County, Marriage records 1832-1848, v. C: 306.

© Deborah Sweeney, 2014.
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2014/04/09/a-mystery-solved-part-3/

A Mystery Solved? (Part 2)

Focus in on a person or location of interest: 

After constructing a timeline of Joseph’s life, the next step is to focus in on either a geographical area where the person lived or a “person of interest.”

Joseph lived in several locations, beginning in Pennsylvania, then Ohio, and finally Indiana. He lived in at least 6 known areas of interest: Pennsylvania, Belmont County (Ohio), Guernsey County (Ohio), Greene County (Indiana), Daviess County (Indiana) and Knox County (Indiana). Two locations that might provide information regarding his parentage would be – his birth place (Pennsylvania) and his death place (Knox County, Indiana). At this point, his birth place is too broad a location to search. In addition, birth records were not recorded at the county or state level in Pennsylvania during the early part of the 19th century. Information regarding Joseph’s death location is rather sketchy. He is buried in Edwardsport, but evidence that he died or even lived there has not been discovered yet. Bodies are not always buried where they died, and are sometimes disinterred and moved to another location to be closer to living family members. Delving deeper into Knox County’s records is currently on the future “to do” list. In addition, the chance of finding Joseph’s parents listed on a death certificate or other death related record is rather slim based upon the time and place where he died. For one, the state of Indiana did not require official death records until after 1900. The WPA death index of Knox County’s extracted county records does not list Joseph Lawhead. For now, focusing on a location of interest will have to wait until more information is available.

There are a handful of individuals that belong to the “person of interest” category. The first one is Bathsheba Lawhead. Thus far only four records have been found that mention Bathsheba:

  • In 1840, Bathsheba Laughead was living in Seneca Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. She was the head of a household of four persons: one female aged 40-49, one male aged 20-29, and two boys under the age of 5.
  • In 1850, ‘Basheba’ Lawhead was living with the family of Joseph in Guernsey County, Ohio. She was a 60 year old female, born in Pennsylvania. The young family of William and Ruth Coen lived next door.
  • In 1860, ‘Barshaby Lockee’ was living in Seneca, Noble County, Ohio. She was the second family living at dwelling #1268. The first family was that of William and Ruth ‘Cower’.
  • In 1870, Bashaly Laughead was living in the household of William and Ruth Coen in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. ‘Bashaly’ was an 80 year old female, born in Ohio.

Until 1880, census records did not record relationships between individuals in a household. Before 1850, only the head of the household was enumerated. The rest of the household was recorded as tally marks in columns designating a person’s age and sex. Using these early census records as a road map, relationships can be established but they cannot be used alone as proof.

Women were very rarely head of households in the 19th century. Two possible reasons why Bathsheba would have been the head of household in 1840 were: she was a widow or a woman of property. Proceeding with the assumption that Bathsheba was a widow, the other members of the family were likely to be her children or grandchildren. The young man in his twenties may have been her son, or a hired hand. The two young boys may have been her grandchildren. Based upon her age in the later census years, Bathsheba was at the far end of the 40-49 age category and close to 50 years old. The boys aged under 5 years were more likely to be her grandchildren, possibly sons of the twenty something male. Perhaps he was a widower, living with his mother, and they were helping each other out as families often do. Of course, the above is all conjecture until any further evidence comes along. The truth remains unknown.

Skip ahead ten years to 1850, Bathsheba now lived with Joseph Lawhead and his family. A likely scenario is that Bathsheba was Joseph’s mother. At 60, she may not have wanted (or been able) to run her own farm or live by herself. Children often took care of their parents then as they do now. Another interesting clue from this census year is that Joseph lived next door to William and Ruth Coen. On 24 March 1844, Ruth Laughead married William Coen in Guernsey County, Ohio.Laughead, Ruth and William Coen - Marriage, 1844 Siblings and in-laws sometimes lived together on adjoining property. Perhaps a bit of land was deeded to a child as a wedding gift or a second house was built on the family property. There are many possible reasons for this proximity. At the very least, an assumption can be made that the families were related due to the shared surname. The 1840 census calls into question why Bathsheba did not have a 15 year old female living in her household. Was Ruth Bathsheba’s daughter or perhaps a niece? Did she live with another relative or work out of the home at that time? There were two Cohen families living nearby Bathsheba and one had a female in the correct age category. Did Ruth live and work on another neighboring farm?

Through the years 1860 and 1870, Bathsheba lived with the Coens. Bathsheba was 80 years old in 1870. She has not been found on the 1880 census, likely dying before then. Between the years 1850-1870, Ruth and her family moved from Guernsey County, to Noble County, and then Tuscarawas County. These three counties are clustered together (and border one another) in the eastern part of Ohio. The Coens lived in Uhrichsville during the time that Bathsheba may have died.

Ruth (Laughead) Coen, Joseph Laughead and Bathsheba Laughead were clearly connected. Bathsheba was born in Pennsylvania, c1790. Joseph was born in Pennsylvania, c1817. Ruth was born in Ohio, c1825. If Joseph and Ruth were two of Bathsheba’s children, their birth dates and locations have helped to narrow down when the family might have moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio. Ruth has become another person of interest because of her geographic proximity to Joseph and their shared connection to Bathsheba.

Sources:

1840 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, Seneca Township, p. 3 (penned), line 15, Bathsheba Laughead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 397.

1850 U. S. census, Guernsey County, Ohio, population schedule, Seneca Township, p. 474 (penned), dwelling 3045, family 3067, Joseph Lawhead; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 684.

1860 U. S. census, Noble County, Ohio, population schedule, Seneca Township, p. 483 (stamped), dwelling 1268, family 1220, Barshaby Lockee; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 1020.

1870 U. S. census, Tuscarawas County, Ohio, population schedule, Uhrichsville, Uhrichsville Post Office, p. 20 (penned), dwelling 150, family 150, William Coen; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 April 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication M593, roll 1273.

“Indiana Deaths, 1882-1920,” index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2014).

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” database and images, Family Search (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 6 April 2014) William Coen and Ruth Laughead, 24 March 1844; citing Guernsey County, Marriage records 1844-1864, v. D: 25.

© Deborah Sweeney, 2014.
Post originally found:  https://genealogylady.net/2014/04/06/a-mystery-solved-part-2/

Sunday’s Obituary – Dr. Henry A. Schwartz

Schwartz, Henry A. - Obituary, 1925Obituary of Dr. Schwartz

Dr. Henry Albert Schwartz, son of Nichols and Barbara Schwartz was born in Berlin, Holmes county Ohio, Oct. 6th, 1857. When still a young man he became a member of the Reformed church. He studied medicine at Western Reserve University, from which school he graduated in 1886. On April 17th, 1895, he was united in marriage with Miss Anna Etrang [sic Strang] at Millersburg, Ohio. Dr. Schwartz practiced medicine first in Indiana. Afterward he located at Greer, Ohio, and finally moved to Loudonville, where he has resided for the past eighteen years. After an ailness of but a few days he departed this life at 3 o’clock, Thursday morning, March 19, 1925, reaching the age of 67 years, 5 months and 13 days. He leaves to mourn his departure his sorrowing wife, and one daughter, Mrs. C. E. Swartzwalder. He is also survived by one grandchild, two brothers and one half-brother, beside other relatives and friends.

Funeral services, conducted by Rev. J. H. Kuhlman, were held at Zion Lutheran church, Sunday, March 22 at 2 p.m. Interment in the Loudonville cemetery. “Watch ye, therefore, for ye know not when the Master of the house cometh”!

“Obituary of Dr. Schwartz,” Ashland-Times Gazette (Ashland, Ohio), 25 March 1925, p. 7.

[Special thanks to the Adult Services Department at the Ashland Public Library in Ashland, Ohio for providing this obituary. I would not have been able to find this obituary without the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center which manages one of the best on-line obituary search databases for the state of Ohio.]

___________________________________

Dr. Henry A. Schwartz was the son of Nicholas Schwartz and his second wife Barbara (Kunz) Schwartz. He was born in Ohio, 6 years after the family emigrated from Switzerland. The obituary gives Henry a fairly good biography so there isn’t much more to add.

Henry and his wife Anna are buried at the Loudonville Cemetery.

©2014 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2014/01/18/sundays-obitua…nry-a-schwartz/

A New Story

For the last 10 days, I have shared the story of Roberta Van Sickle’s tragic death. The process of searching for and then finding contemporary newspaper clippings is exciting. I found that I really like telling stories this way, giving little bits at a time, like an old newspaper, radio or television serial. Yesterday, I reached the end of this part of Roberta’s story. Any good historian or genealogist will tell you that the story is never over. There are always new documents and discoveries to be found. So today, I am picking up a new thread to weave. This one takes place over several decades as the pieces of one man’s life were woven into place. Like Roberta’s story, I will let the documents, clippings and book excerpts tell the tale in chronological order.

My new story tells the tale of William B. Schwartz, also known as W. B. Schwartz. He was the son of Niklaus Schwartz and his second wife, Anna Barbara Kunz, emigrants from Switzerland. William was one of the younger children in the family so he had the privilege of being born an American. William’s older sister, Elizabeth, became the wife of Christian Yegerlehner. I hesitate to call them half siblings as Niklaus’ two wives were sisters. So even though William and Elizabeth had different mothers, they had the same grandparents. Until 1880, William lived in Holmes County, Ohio where he was born. By 1883, he was living in Clay County, Indiana near his sister Elizabeth and her family. He was a school teacher, teaching his nephews at the local school in Harrison township. This is where my story begins.

Schwartz - 1880 census detail

1880 Census detail from Holmes County, Ohio – Household of Nicholas Schwartz

The first newspaper clipping to mention William was posted several weeks ago in the post School Grades.

©2014 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2014/01/08/a-new-story/