Category Archives: Newspaper Clippings

Lena’s Postcards #6

Postmark:
Appleton, Wis. June 12 1909 10 A.M.

Addressed to:
Mrs. J.W.Hackleman
Connersville
Ind
R R #2

June-12-09

Dear Folks: – We are expecting Grandma Miller today. J. Jr. wants an automobile (big one), bicycle, and a box of chocolates. I wonder if she’ll bring all of them.

Yours Huston


Huston’s first wife was Elizabeth Irene “Bessie” Miller. They were married on 25 April 1906 in her hometown of McGregor, Clayton County, Iowa. They had one son, Willard Wesley Hackleman, who was born in the spring of 1907. Six months later, in October, Bessie died suddenly while they were visiting family in Iowa. John Carl Hackleman, Huston’s brother, lived with the family in Appleton for many years. In Huston’s postcard, J. Jr. could possibly be his son, Willard, or his brother, John Carl!


Connersville Evening News 1907-10-02 Mrs. Hackleman deadMRS. HACKLEMAN DEAD
Wife of Huston Hackleman Passes
Away at McGregor, Iowa –
News Received, To-day.

J. W. Hackleman, living east of Fairview, received a telegram, from his son, Huston Hackleman, to-day, stating that the latter’s wife had died very suddenly, while on a visit to relatives at McGregor, Iowa. Huston Hackleman, who is a young man, is well known in this city, as well as in his native neighborhood about Fairview. He was married less than two years ago and has lived at Appleton, Wisconsin since that time.

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hackleman have gone to McGregor.

“Mrs. Hackleman Dead,” Connersville Evening News (Connersville, Indiana), 2 October 1907, p. 1, col. 3; digital image, Newspaper Archive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 11 March 2015).

©2015 copyright owned, written and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/03/13/lenas-postcards-6/

Smallpox Epidemic, Part LXXXVII

Indianapolis Journal - 1900-05-02 (Smallpox epidemic), p. 2THREE SMALLPOX CASES

MANY EXPOSURES TO THE DISEASE
OCCURRED AT ELWOOD

Five New Victims at Brazil – Striking
Divorce Annulment at Kokomo-
Suicide of an Aged Woman.

Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
ELWOOD, Ind., May 1. – This city is just now experiencing a smallpox scare of considerable proportions, and many people are preparing to leave in the fear that a quarantine will be declared. Persons who are visiting here are hurrying to get out. One of the three cases in a boarding house, and fourteen persons were exposed before the nature of the disease became known. Another is Jacob Groves, a saloon keeper, who was at his place of business until a few hours before he was taken ill.

Many persons have been exposed, and a wholesale vaccination has been ordered.

Five Cases at Brazil.

Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
BRAZIL, Ind., May 1. – Five cases of smallpox were discovered here by the health officer, Dr. Glasgo, this afternoon. The patients are thoroughly broken out, and all the physicians called in consultation agreed on the disease. The infected houses will be quarantined.

“Three Smallpox Cases,” The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana), 2 May 1900, p. 2, col. 3; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 3 March 2015).

Smallpox Epidemic, Part LXXXVI

Indianapolis Journal - 1900-05-01 (Smallpox epidemic), p. 6HAD SMALLPOX

But Worked All the Time – R.S. Van
Pelt Now Has the Disease

Dr. Ferguson, of the City Board of Health, yesterday discovered a case of smallpox in the home of R. S. Van Pelt, No. 124 Hermann street. His residence was quarantined and with it three other members of his family. He is thought to have taken the disease from his son-in-law, John Zener, living at No. 404 North Pine street. Investigation showed that Zener has had the smallpox and has completely recovered. During the time of his illness he kept at work at the Atkins saw works, where he is employed. He said he thought he had the grip.

“Had Smallpox,” The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana), 1 May 1900, p. 6, col. 1; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 3 March 2015).

Smallpox Epidemic, Part LXXXV

Indianapolis Journal - 1900-05-01 (Smallpox epidemic), p. 2Two Cases of Smallpox

Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
RUSHVILLE, Ind., April 30. – Two mild cases of smallpox have been under quarantine at Conersville since Friday. The patiens are a Mrs. Sanders and a section hand named Long. The City Council has taken prompt precautionary measures to prevent a spread of the smallpox.

“Two Cases of Smallpox,” The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana), 1 May 1900, p. 2, col. 5; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 3 March 2015).

Smallpox Epidemic, Part LXXXIV

Indianapolis Journal - 1900-04-30 (Smallpox epidemic), p. 8A New Case Discovered

A new case of smallpox was discovered yesterday at 20 West Minnesota street. The sufferer is Hiram Grider, a laborer. His brother was removed to the hospital two weeks ago, afflicted with the same disease.

“A New Case Discovered,” The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana), 30 April 1900, p. 8, col. 1; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 3 March 2015).

Smallpox Epidemic, Part LXXXIII

Indianapolis Journal - 1900-04-29 (Smallpox epidemic), p. 8Louis Thompson Has Smallpox

Another case of smallpox was reported to the Board of Health yesterday, the patient being Louis Thompson, living at No. 1716 Yandes street. He is employed by one of the gas companies, and the Board of Health fears that many people have come in contact with Thompson. He has been sent to the detention hospital and the other five members of the family placed under quarantine.

“Louis Thompson Has Smallpox,” The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana), 29 April 1900, p. 8, col. 3; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 3 March 2015).

Smallpox Epidemic, Part LXXXII

Indianapolis Journal - 1900-04-28 (Smallpox epidemic), p. 8AT BOTH ENDS OF LINE.

J.A. Martin is Barred Out Because of
Smallpox

When J. A. Martin, a railroad employee, returned from a trip to Columbus, O., Thursday and started to enter his home at 16 Walcott street he met physicians leaving the place, who told him that he could not go in, as there was smallpox there. The patient is Claude B. Stanley, also a railroad man, who returned from a trip to Columbus, O., a few days ago, where he contracted the disease. He has been sent to the detention hospital and Mrs. Martin and her two children place under quarantine. Mr. Martin said he was compelled to leave his regular boarding house in Columbus, O., on account of smallpox breaking out among the boarders during his absence, and when he returned to his home in this city he found he could not get into his own home on account of smallpox.

“At Both Ends of Line,” The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana), 28 April 1900, p. 8, col. 1; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 3 February 2015).