Tag Archives: Christian Yegerlehner

Another Real Estate Transaction

Schwartz, W. B. - 1892-05-26Real Estate Transfers

Furnished the DEMOCRAT by Moss & Bowman, abstractors:

Carbon Block Coal company to John M. Brown, lot 2, block 2, Carbon, $100.

H.L. Ringo to Wm. Steinsberger, lot 9, Ringo’s 1st Brazil, $150.

Samuel Anderson to Richard Buell, 80 acres in Washington, $800.

John E. Page to Albert Watson, lot 13, Montgomery’s Brazil, $600.

John Fair to C. Yegerlehner, lot 11, block 2, Fair’s 1st Clay City, $80.

W. B. Schwartz by Sheriff to A. B. Wheeler, strip in Brazil, Sheriff deed, $712.82.

“Real Estate Transfers,” The Brazil Democrat (Brazil, Indiana), 26 May 1892, p. 1, col. 5; digital image, Newspaper Archive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 12 February 2014).

[Editor’s note: Did you catch the land sale directly above W. B.’s? C. Yegerlehner is W. B.’s brother-in-law, and Roscoe’s grandfather.]

A New Story

For the last 10 days, I have shared the story of Roberta Van Sickle’s tragic death. The process of searching for and then finding contemporary newspaper clippings is exciting. I found that I really like telling stories this way, giving little bits at a time, like an old newspaper, radio or television serial. Yesterday, I reached the end of this part of Roberta’s story. Any good historian or genealogist will tell you that the story is never over. There are always new documents and discoveries to be found. So today, I am picking up a new thread to weave. This one takes place over several decades as the pieces of one man’s life were woven into place. Like Roberta’s story, I will let the documents, clippings and book excerpts tell the tale in chronological order.

My new story tells the tale of William B. Schwartz, also known as W. B. Schwartz. He was the son of Niklaus Schwartz and his second wife, Anna Barbara Kunz, emigrants from Switzerland. William was one of the younger children in the family so he had the privilege of being born an American. William’s older sister, Elizabeth, became the wife of Christian Yegerlehner. I hesitate to call them half siblings as Niklaus’ two wives were sisters. So even though William and Elizabeth had different mothers, they had the same grandparents. Until 1880, William lived in Holmes County, Ohio where he was born. By 1883, he was living in Clay County, Indiana near his sister Elizabeth and her family. He was a school teacher, teaching his nephews at the local school in Harrison township. This is where my story begins.

Schwartz - 1880 census detail

1880 Census detail from Holmes County, Ohio – Household of Nicholas Schwartz

The first newspaper clipping to mention William was posted several weeks ago in the post School Grades.

©2014 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2014/01/08/a-new-story/

Travel Tuesday – Voyage to America

Yegerlehner, David and family - Ship manifest, 1851

Image via Ancestry (Click to enlarge)

About halfway down the above ship manifest from the Northumberland which sailed from London to New York is the name David Jacalander. He sailed to America with his wife and three children: Madga, Christian, Rosena, and John. The ship arrived in New York on 26 April 1851. David and his family were natives of Switzerland. He was a weaver by trade. The rest of the page is filled with the names of Swiss immigrants of various trades: wheelwright, cooper, dyer, tailor, joiner, and mason. Perhaps the group was traveling together to the new world, to begin a new community. The reason for the emigration of the Jacalander family is unknown. A family legend speaks of the fear of impressment into the Prussian army.

While Jacalander is not a Swiss surname, Jegerlehner is. The Swiss are very protective of their heritage. Even today surnames are registered and can be located on the official Registry. Since the family departed Europe from London, likely the lowly English clerk did not understand the thick German Swiss accent when he recorded the family on the manifest. In America, David Jacalander became David Yegerlehner, the ancestor of all who share the name.

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/11/25/travel-tuesday…age-to-america/

Military Monday – Declaration for Original Invalid Pension

Yegerlehner, Christian - Declaration for original invalid pension, 1888

DECLARATION FOR ORIGINAL INVALID PENSION
To be executed before a court of record or some officer thereof having custody of its seal

State of Indiana
County of Clay
On this 29 day of February, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight personally appeared before me, Clerk of the Circuit Court, a court of record within and for the county and State aforesaid, Christian Yegerlehner, aged 51 years, a resident of the ________of________county of Clay state of Indiana, who being duly sworn according to law, declared that he is the identical Christian Yegerlehner, who was ENROLLED on the 22 day of March, 1865, in company B of the 33 regiment of Indiana commanded by Ben H. Freeland, and was honorably DISCHARGED at Louisville Ky on the 21 day of July, 1865; that his personal description is as follows: Age, 51; height, 5 feet 3 ½ inches; complexion, Dark; hair, Dark; eyes Brown. That while a member of the organization aforesaid, in the service and in the line of his duty at Louisville, in the State of Kentucky on or about the — day of July, 1865, he contracted diarrhea by exposure and drinking impure water.

The above is the correct an informal affidavit on file.

Book of Me – Prompt 11: Military

book of meThe Book of Me – Written by You is a weekly blog prompt created by Julie Goucher of the blog Angler’s Rest. This is a fifteen month writing project to highlight my life so that I will have something to leave behind for my descendants. Week eleven’s prompt is the Military.

Did you join the military?
Were you encouraged or discouraged?
Did a family member?
Regular or for a particular incident?
Did you or your family serve overseas in the line of service either during a war or as a posting?
Any thoughts, photographs, relevant memories?

Malcolm W. Leonard

My great grandfather
Malcolm W. Leonard, 1918

The military was something that never appealed to me. I consider myself a pacifist and I dislike guns and violence immensely. The thought of putting myself in the line of fire or anywhere near guns terrifies me. As a child, I remember reviewing possible future professions. Any job involving blood or violence was immediately excluded.  A medical career was also stricken from the list. This fear also extends to travel in foreign countries where violence towards humanity is higher than average.

When I came of age in the 1980s, the United States was not involved in any military conflicts. The Vietnam War was still an open wound and the Gulf Wars were yet to come. A career in the military wasn’t even a consideration.  For women, there were very few options in the military back then. My family has no recent veterans. My father escaped service during Vietnam as well as all my uncles. We were not touched. Having so many family members in religious professions may have had an influence. Some distant cousins may have fought in either Vietnam or Korea, but the last true family veterans came from World War II.

Yegerlehner, Christian - Clay City, Indiana, c1890

Christian Yegerlehner
Civil War Veteran

I readily admit that my opinion of the military has changed over the years. My limited exposure to the military colored my opinion for much of my youth. During college, I was disgusted by the machismo of my ROTC classmates. However, as our modern conflicts have dragged on, I have come to hold our military service members in high esteem. I cannot fathom the sacrifices they have made and the injuries they have suffered.

As I have studied my family’s history, I have felt pride for my ancestors who fought for our country in World War II, World War I, the Spanish-American War, the Civil War, the War of 1812 and the Revolutionary War. They experienced untold horrors to mold the country that we live in today. One of my greatest hopes is that neither of my children (or my descendants) will have to make similar sacrifices to defend our country. I hope that one day we can solve our conflicts through peaceful means.

Perhaps this is one of the photographs from Dr. Lentz's roll of film

The veteran dearest to my heart is my grandfather, Roscoe S. Yegerlehner. Please take a moment to explore my blog and enter his world during World War II.

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/11/10/book-of-me-prompt-11-military/

Tombstone Tuesday – David Yegerlehner

Image courtesy of

Image courtesy of Tonya & Keith Tetidrick

David Yegerlehner (originally Jegerlehner) was the immigrant ancestor of Roscoe’s family in America. David arrived with his wife, Magdalena, and three children, Christian, John and Rosina, in 1851. They were natives of Bern, Switzerland. While each of the three children settled in different areas of Indiana, David stayed with his eldest son Christian. When Christian bought land in Clay County, Indiana, David set up his carpet weaving shop across the road from the farm house.

David’s grandchildren erected this modern stone at the cemetery in his honor.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=38084666

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/11/04/tombstone-tues…id-yegerlehner/