Travel Tuesday – Voyage to America

Yegerlehner, David and family - Ship manifest, 1851

Image via Ancestry (Click to enlarge)

About halfway down the above ship manifest from the Northumberland which sailed from London to New York is the name David Jacalander. He sailed to America with his wife and three children: Madga, Christian, Rosena, and John. The ship arrived in New York on 26 April 1851. David and his family were natives of Switzerland. He was a weaver by trade. The rest of the page is filled with the names of Swiss immigrants of various trades: wheelwright, cooper, dyer, tailor, joiner, and mason. Perhaps the group was traveling together to the new world, to begin a new community. The reason for the emigration of the Jacalander family is unknown. A family legend speaks of the fear of impressment into the Prussian army.

While Jacalander is not a Swiss surname, Jegerlehner is. The Swiss are very protective of their heritage. Even today surnames are registered and can be located on the official Registry. Since the family departed Europe from London, likely the lowly English clerk did not understand the thick German Swiss accent when he recorded the family on the manifest. In America, David Jacalander became David Yegerlehner, the ancestor of all who share the name.

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/11/25/travel-tuesday…age-to-america/

2 thoughts on “Travel Tuesday – Voyage to America

  1. davidmadison1942

    How in the world do you find these documents? 🙂

    This gave me goosebumps: “…likely the lowly English clerk did not understand the thick German Swiss accent when he recorded the family on the manifest. In America, David Jacalander became David Yegerlehner, the ancestor of all who share the name.” 🙂

    Reply
    1. Genealogy Lady Post author

      Lots of money and time thrown at various websites. 🙂 The sad thing is that when I first starting corresponding with Uncle Floyd, he had been searching for the ship manifest for years, the old school way, i.e. traveling to libraries and looking through rolls of microfilm. The proverbial needle in a haystack! Ancestry didn’t have this database online until after Floyd died so I couldn’t share it with him. 😦

      Reply

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