Tag Archives: Spanish American War

Military Monday – Spanish War

In 1898, the United States waged a war with Spain for ten weeks over the independence of Cuba. There were other reasons but Cuba was the main one. About 300,000 American soldiers were involved in the conflict. There were 345 casualties due to combat and 2,565 due to disease (mainly yellow fever). Another 1,577 soldiers were wounded. Compared to the Civil War, the Spanish American war was a fist fight.

Few families have Spanish War veterans in their ranks. The Schiele family had one and he was Silvester Schiele. Over the years, I have come across several subtle references to Silvester’s involvement including a reference by Roscoe in one of his letters. Silvester was Roscoe’s uncle, also known as Uncle Wes to those of you who have been following along. Lately, more military databases have come online due in part to the relationship between Fold3 and the National Archives. Ancestry has also posted many military databases.  I now have a clearer idea of Silvester’s service but I still have one more step. I need to order his pension file. Maybe I’ll do that soon!

Record of Service card

Record of Service

Pension card

Pension card

For more information on the Spanish American War, click here.

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/12/01/military-monday-spanish-war/

Book of Me – Prompt 11: Military

book of meThe Book of Me – Written by You is a weekly blog prompt created by Julie Goucher of the blog Angler’s Rest. This is a fifteen month writing project to highlight my life so that I will have something to leave behind for my descendants. Week eleven’s prompt is the Military.

Did you join the military?
Were you encouraged or discouraged?
Did a family member?
Regular or for a particular incident?
Did you or your family serve overseas in the line of service either during a war or as a posting?
Any thoughts, photographs, relevant memories?

Malcolm W. Leonard

My great grandfather
Malcolm W. Leonard, 1918

The military was something that never appealed to me. I consider myself a pacifist and I dislike guns and violence immensely. The thought of putting myself in the line of fire or anywhere near guns terrifies me. As a child, I remember reviewing possible future professions. Any job involving blood or violence was immediately excluded.  A medical career was also stricken from the list. This fear also extends to travel in foreign countries where violence towards humanity is higher than average.

When I came of age in the 1980s, the United States was not involved in any military conflicts. The Vietnam War was still an open wound and the Gulf Wars were yet to come. A career in the military wasn’t even a consideration.  For women, there were very few options in the military back then. My family has no recent veterans. My father escaped service during Vietnam as well as all my uncles. We were not touched. Having so many family members in religious professions may have had an influence. Some distant cousins may have fought in either Vietnam or Korea, but the last true family veterans came from World War II.

Yegerlehner, Christian - Clay City, Indiana, c1890

Christian Yegerlehner
Civil War Veteran

I readily admit that my opinion of the military has changed over the years. My limited exposure to the military colored my opinion for much of my youth. During college, I was disgusted by the machismo of my ROTC classmates. However, as our modern conflicts have dragged on, I have come to hold our military service members in high esteem. I cannot fathom the sacrifices they have made and the injuries they have suffered.

As I have studied my family’s history, I have felt pride for my ancestors who fought for our country in World War II, World War I, the Spanish-American War, the Civil War, the War of 1812 and the Revolutionary War. They experienced untold horrors to mold the country that we live in today. One of my greatest hopes is that neither of my children (or my descendants) will have to make similar sacrifices to defend our country. I hope that one day we can solve our conflicts through peaceful means.

Perhaps this is one of the photographs from Dr. Lentz's roll of film

The veteran dearest to my heart is my grandfather, Roscoe S. Yegerlehner. Please take a moment to explore my blog and enter his world during World War II.

©2013 copyright owned and written by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found at: https://genealogylady.net/2013/11/10/book-of-me-prompt-11-military/