Tag Archives: writing

Lots of Love, Daddy Update

Lots of Love, Daddy coverI have been spending the bulk of my summer vacation working on getting the next World War II letters book ready for publication. I return to work at the end of the week and the book is almost done. One of the most labor intensive parts of writing a non-fiction book is creating the index. The letters mention hundreds, if not thousands of individuals. Lots of Love, Daddy which covers the fall of 1942 includes over 300 people, including three presidents, several radio and screen personalities, military personnel and, of course, many citizens of Kentland, Indiana.

As an early teaser (and potential lure for future readers), I am posting the full index of the book. Perhaps you will find someone you know in the index!

Index (of Lots of Love, Daddy)

The following is an index of the people mentioned in the letters. Roscoe and Gladys, as well as their three sons, John, Mark and David, have not been included in this index as they are mentioned in virtually every letter.

Ade, Charles H., Dr.
180, 184, 195, 200, 212, 213, 233

Ade, Mary E. (Keller), Dr.
213

Allgood
141, 145, 282

Allgood, Lorene L. (Morphew)
25, 60

Ash, Dorotha M. (Williams)
25, 50, 64, 86, 92, 122, 219, 265

Ash, Herman H., Dr.
22, 28, 32, 50, 64, 86, 92, 166, 196, 211, 232, 234

Baer, Walter B.
70

Bair
326

Baker, Kenny
375

Barce, J. Edward
13, 28, 184, 278, 317, 360

Barr
387

Barrymore, Lionel
358

Bartlett, Helen (Cox)
25, 363

Bartlett, Ward K.
46, 58, 145, 168, 172, 230, 236, 252, 313, 321, 331

Baze, Shirley A. (Neary)
194

Beard, Paul H., Dr.
114

Beaver
316

Beaver, Helen Elizabeth “Betty” (Neher)
101

Beekman, Evelyn (Muir)
242

Beekman, Sharon
242

Benny, Jack
278

Boone, Jean
25, 162, 312, 355

Boone, Otto E. “Boonie”
25, 36, 70, 131, 132, 134, 162, 164, 171, 220, 223, 236, 251, 259, 284, 286, 290, 311, 312, 321, 333, 346, 355, 362

Bower, Raymond
251, 360

Brands, Fred A.
160, 263

Brands, Maude (Westvay)
160

Britton, Edward L.
116, 121, 270–71

Britton, Louise (Strader)
102

Britton, Thomas S.
270

Bruck, Paul J.
116, 121

Burge, Lucile (Schlinsog)
194

Bushnell, Dr.
245, 284

Byrne, John C. “Jack”
102, 113, 192, 264, 290, 297, 301, 346, 380

Calvert, Raymond R., Dr.
32

Carroll, Babe
41

Cast, Alvin C.
41, 79

Cast, William H.
79

Coan, Earl
25

Coan, Emma J. (Miller)
25

Coffel, Dorothy J. (Teague)
103

Coffel, Melvin H., Dr.
103

Cole, Ira, Dr.
6, 8, 9, 15, 19, 29, 32, 50, 54, 86, 90, 95, 98, 102, 112, 116, 117, 120, 154, 167, 172, 184, 190, 200, 233, 234, 241, 245, 246, 251, 258, 259, 264, 271, 281, 301, 302, 309, 310, 336, 346, 355, 372, 379, 380

Cole, Mabel M. (Biser)
234, 336

Cummings, R. Ray
162

Cunningham, Frank E.
157, 282

Cunningham, Winifred F. (Booty)
157, 282

Curtis, Delmar E.
190

Curtis, Rosamund E. (Dyer)
190

Davis, William E.
138–39

Dennis, Donna
302

Diedam, Dorothy “Dora”
386

Disney, Walt
362

Dixon, Ira
88–89, 104, 110, 119, 123, 128, 134, 148, 171, 265

Donahue, Carl J.
177, 250, 321

Durbin, Deanna
334

Dye, George
12, 69, 79, 373

Dye, Letha L.
140

Dye, Linda
373

Dye, Velda (Good)
12, 69, 373

Dyer
190

Dyer, May K. (Prue)
190

Easley, Charles J.
162, 239, 243

Easterly, Aileen
60

Eddy, Nelson
366

Evans, Nannie
343, 374

Fellman/Feldman
22

Fletcher, Emma (Cox)
172, 355

Fletcher, James B.
20, 172, 355

Fletcher, Joseph B.
303

Flickinger, Daniel W.
209, 226

Foster, Emily H. “Emma” (Lawhead)
3, 11, 25, 33, 34, 37, 41, 55, 57, 74, 78, 90, 91, 95, 109, 113, 121, 125, 130, 140, 144, 154, 158, 163, 167, 168, 170, 171, 172, 177, 184, 255, 262, 291, 328, 329, 343, 351, 358, 382

Foster, James L.
3, 13, 28, 41, 46, 53, 86–87, 122, 144, 184, 191, 207, 242, 255, 291, 297, 300, 302, 328, 343, 378, 382

Foster, Thelma (Mayrose)
13, 46, 53, 255, 297, 302, 328, 351, 378

Foulkes
60, 85, 191, 359, 364

Foulkes, Cora T. “Cocoa” (Trautmann)
25, 277, 283, 343, 347, 352

Foulkes, Harold “Red”
283, 343

Funk
159, 191, 213, 284, 380

Funk, Arlene (Nelson)
3, 8, 25, 45, 50, 60, 74, 109, 155, 159, 190, 198, 200, 210, 252, 271, 288, 291, 293, 310, 324, 328, 329, 343, 346, 351, 374, 380, 385

Funk, Bernard
198

Funk, Carl E.
192, 338

Funk, Donald E.
8, 45, 50, 73, 74, 76, 143, 155, 198, 252, 271, 288, 310, 328, 346, 347, 364, 374

Funk, Edward J.
338

Funk, Evelyn
198

Funk, Robert W.
45, 65, 210, 329, 342, 346, 347

Funk, Rosemary (Robinson)
25, 60, 310

Funk, William E.
159, 199, 342, 343, 351, 380, 385

Gardiner, James W., Dr.
239, 295, 300, 339

Garrigus, George
382

Gilman, Page
265

Gilmore, Claude D.
303

Gilmour, Alex L.
264

Gilmour, M. Jean (Spindler)
210

Glenn, John
178

Glenn, M. Louise (Krull)
60, 116, 178, 200, 271, 328, 346

Glick, Orval E., Dr.
282

Good, Beulah (Eaton)
69, 373

Good, Edward
69, 373

Gordon, Gale
265

Hall, Donald W.
177

Harlan, Charles C. “Chuckie”
113, 198

Harlan, Chester C.
113

Harlan, D. Lorene (Nicely)
113, 198

Harris, Paul
225, 229, 313, 348

Harris, Phil
278

Healy, Harry H.
192

Heindel, Daniel M.
213

Heindel, Helen G. (Kline)
213, 222

Hiestand, Pauline (Markley)
45, 335

Hoover, Floyd E.
207

Hufty
60, 316, 335

Hufty, Clarice M. (Bartlett)
8, 9, 25, 37, 53, 120

Hufty, Robert L., Sr.
8, 9, 53, 112, 120, 151, 167, 220, 223, 265, 380, 389

Huth, Frances E.
275

Huth, Ralph L., Dr.
32, 239, 275, 295, 300, 306, 307, 312, 339

Huth, Ralph L., Jr.
275

James, Cora (Hufford)
25, 57, 60, 65, 241

Johnson, Edward
92, 93, 152, 153, 160, 220, 223

Johnson, James E. “Jimmy Ed”
167, 183

Johnson, Lucile
3, 7, 25, 50, 60, 118, 152, 160, 167, 171, 183, 242, 291, 293, 360, 366, 383

Jones, Dale S.
41

Jones, Kenny
41, 121, 207

Juventia, Sister
8, 12, 51

Kenney, T. Arthur “Art”
27, 34, 36, 102, 113, 116, 121, 123

Kildare, James, Dr.
322

Kindall, Mrs.
25

Kindig, Curtis B.
191, 206

Kindig, John E. “Jack”
191, 206

Kline, Forest S.
213, 219

Kline, Gertrude (Tjepkema)
25, 60, 213, 219

Knollin, Helen (Washburn)
292, 330, 335

Knollin, Loyal C.
330

Knowlton, E. Mary (Gibson)
60

Koon, Carl D., Sr.
143

Koon, Carl D., Jr.
143

Koon, Helen M. (Arbuckle)
143

Krug, Paul A.
288

Krull
229, 312, 315, 317

Krull, Dorothy (Jackson)
3, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 24, 25, 29, 37, 60, 98, 120, 121, 125, 167, 173, 180, 225, 284, 291, 292, 311–12, 315, 320, 324, 329, 335, 352, 373

Krull, Elizabeth L. “Betty Lou”
23, 60, 68, 151, 195, 198, 201, 302, 354

Krull, John
177

Krull, Nicholas P. “Nick,” Sr.
11, 25, 110, 151, 177, 180, 272, 302, 311, 325, 335, 340

Krull, Nicholas P. “Buddy,” Jr.
151, 183, 238, 302, 315, 335, 354

Kruman, Margaret (Servies)
50

Lamb, Newell A.
121, 197, 210

Largent, Charles
237

Lentz, Edmund T., Dr.
4, 18, 47, 52–53, 55, 70, 80, 85, 114, 127, 136, 153, 171, 181, 187, 192, 194, 196, 247, 330, 371, 372, 376, 384, 389

Ley, Earl F. “Bud”
108, 222

Ley, Inez L. (Kline)
108, 222, 334

Ley, John Ed
108, 222, 334, 338

Ley, John P.
108, 222, 334, 338

Ley, Nadine
222

Lincoln, Abraham
305

Lontz, William Howard
265, 349, 356

Loughridge, Bun
281

Mace, David A.
40, 46, 101, 113, 256, 329, 338, 339, 378

Mace, Marie (Smith)
40, 46, 101, 256, 329, 338, 339, 378

Marx Brothers
375

Mathews, Alta (Bittles)
277

Mathews, Wilbur C., Dr.
20, 41, 160, 216, 242, 258, 273, 277, 278, 282, 298, 310, 355, 360, 364, 380

McConnell
75

McCray, George W.
270, 356

McQueary, Charles E.
222, 225

Molter, Agnes
24, 115, 157, 197, 216, 231, 256, 283, 297, 334, 378

Molter, Clara
238, 251, 252, 272, 280, 282, 319, 320, 329, 342, 350, 372, 373, 378, 382

Monroe, George
15, 29–30, 54, 191, 241, 344, 381

Morris, Mrs.
193

Morton, Mildred M. (Hopkins)
159, 284

Mullen, C. Patrick
69, 113, 121

Mullen, Joseph W.
69, 113, 121

Mutchler, John Earl
25, 46, 50, 68, 83, 199, 242, 328, 329

Mutchler, Romaine
50, 83

Mutchler, Ruth E. (Yegerlehner)
3–4, 24, 25, 46, 50, 58, 60, 68, 73, 74, 76, 83, 87, 101, 123, 128, 131, 132, 134, 145, 177, 213, 215, 232, 242, 280, 284, 287, 291, 297, 300, 302, 305, 326, 328, 329, 333, 336, 343, 358, 359, 365, 387

Myers, Alba O.
34, 121

Myers, Keith W.
121, 172

Myers, Kenneth J.
121, 172

Nesbitt, Sarah E. “Betty” (Cooper)
53

Nesbitt, Thomas D.
53

Oliver, Dorothy J. (Yagerline)
192

Oliver, Jane
192

Oliver, Robert J.
192

Openshaw, James F., Dr.
32

Oppy, James
303

Paul, Otto A.
209, 285, 312, 346, 355

Parr, Dorothy (Widmar)
34, 245

Parr, Harlan
245, 364, 365

Pence, Thaddeus W.
303

Penner, Joe
330

Perkins, Denver R.
116, 283

Perkins, Thelma M. (Duttenhaver)
116

Pfeiffer, Helen (Coan)
380

Plummer, Ethel (Taylor)
121, 125, 126, 232, 255, 260, 285, 320, 324, 329

Plummer, John W.
255

Poe, Edgar Allen
269

Porterfield, Billy M.
165, 275

Porterfield, Catherine E. (McLuckie)
165, 275

Porterfield, Marvin H., Dr., Sr.
4, 161, 165, 208, 221, 273, 275, 276, 282, 300, 306, 327, 330, 331, 339, 341, 353, 356, 361, 366, 371

Porterfield, Marvin H., Jr.
165, 275

Porterfield, Susan V.
275

Portteus
272, 310

Portteus, G. Harold
108, 311

Portteus, James J.
108

Portteus, Mary A. (Brown)
60, 108, 311, 383

Portteus, Ruth
108, 383

Pratt, Ralph F.
380

Prue
190

Puetz, Florence (Bower)
329

Puetz, Jim L.
329

Puetz, Raymond G.
329

Rea, Judith A.
342

Reinhart, Grace (Barsaloux) Kenefick
292

Reinhart, Henry W., Jr.
171, 184, 237, 260, 273, 275, 292, 317

Rentschler, Lewis C., Dr.
15, 278

Reynolds, Irvin
20

Rinard, Charles A.
255, 351

Roberts, Carol
237, 256, 374

Roberts, Earl L., Dr.
121, 320, 352

Roberts, John
237, 256, 374

Roberts, Joseph M., Dr.
4, 46, 59, 97, 112, 133, 183, 192, 221, 230, 231, 237, 244–45, 260, 273, 275, 281, 283, 284, 312, 345, 371, 374

Roberts, Leila M. (Locke)
4, 46, 53, 54, 59, 60, 69, 112, 121, 133, 163, 180, 183, 192, 221, 230, 237, 244–45, 256, 260, 281, 283, 312, 352, 374

Roberts, William
237, 256, 374

Roosevelt, Eleanor
215

Roosevelt, Franklin D.
169, 215

Runyon, Damon
36, 47

Ryan, Marjorie L. (Wilson)
51, 65, 98, 117, 190

Ryan, Richard R.
51, 98

Ryan, Richard S.
51, 98, 117, 190

Sammons, Hume L.
320, 329

Schiele, Jesse (MacDonald)
34, 60, 185, 229

Schiele, Silvester
24, 81, 173, 185, 225, 229, 237, 248, 302, 313, 348

Schlegel
270, 354

Schlegel, Agnes G. (Bond)
354

Schuh, Anthony
115

Schurtter, Dorothy (VanScoyk)
342

Schurtter, Robert
65, 255, 342

Schurtter, Steven J.
342

Servies, Goldie E. (Couger)
163, 167, 170

Servies, Voris B., Rev.
163, 167, 170

Shandy, Clifford O.
24, 121, 140, 340, 387

Shaw, Artie
22–23

Sherman
256

Shirer, William L.
311

Shirk, Chafee W.
108

Shirk, Sara (Terry)
108, 282

Simons, Charles M.
108

Simons, Eleanor O. (Robinson)
336

Simons, Geneva E. (Holley)
108

Simons, John W.
303, 336

Simons, Robert R.
108

Skelton, Red
111, 191, 286

Smith, Frances E. (Liggitt)
180

Smith, Gertrude M.
180, 192, 336, 374

Smith, Jean
180

Sparks, Anna L. (Moffitt)
25

Staton
60, 241, 284, 358, 359, 364

Staton, Irene A. (James)
25, 57, 132, 343

Staton, James L.
65, 178, 241, 358

Staton, Lloyd K. “Link”
87, 112, 120, 178, 191, 230, 242, 343, 358, 381

Steele, Birdie B.
352

Steiner, Henry J.
131

Stevens, Clarence V.
199

Stevens, Dolores L. (Yegerlehner)
109, 329

Swartz, Mrs.
193

Sykes
34, 73, 76, 78, 81, 87, 104, 110, 117, 282, 345

Sykes, D.
46

Sykes, Ethel M.
76, 82–84

Sykes, John T.
82–84

Taylor, Amel
121, 130, 229

Temple, Shirley
331

Thompson, David
65, 358

Thompson, John Doss
358

Thompson, Mary (Davidson)
65, 98, 358, 364

Tilton, George D.
264, 272, 340, 343, 387

Tilton, Lloyd E.
387

Tilton, Mabel (Stewart)
283, 387

Tilton, Robert L.
283

Towers, Eleanor G.
255

Towers, Emory F., Jr.
41, 121

Van Scoyk, Chester L.
157, 325

Virgin, Max E.
79

Voglund, Arthur A. “Art”
207

Voglund, Vivian T. (Murphy)
207

Walker, Alma L. (Ford)
60, 159

Walker, Wayne
302, 352, 360, 373

Walkup
141, 145, 294, 308

Walkup, Bernard W. “Bun”
9, 19, 164, 266, 283

Walkup, Carolyn J.
9

Walkup, Iva J. (Schluttenhofer)
9, 12, 19, 164

Walsh, Mary E. (Robbins)
15, 81, 88, 122, 276, 343

Walsh, Maurice R., Dr.
4, 15, 81, 88, 122, 221, 276, 343

Washburn
60

Washburn, Howard C.
343

Washburn, Mary M. (Caldwell)
25, 335

Washburn, Ursel (McCoy)
343

Washington, George
305

Watson, Ethel K. (Lloyd)
25, 60, 329

Watson, Wayne P.
25, 48, 51, 58, 60, 149, 153, 156, 329, 345

Webster, George L.
108, 170, 219

Weissman, Marvin F., Dr.
245

White, Dorothy L.
41

White, Ruth (Simons)
336

Whiteakker, Hannah C. (Smith)
206

Wilborn, Priscilla
25

Williams, Fred M., Dr.
4, 161, 208, 211, 221, 227, 240, 273, 275, 276, 282, 285, 295, 300, 312, 330, 339, 341, 353, 354, 356, 361, 365, 366, 371

Williams, Donnas B. (Loughery)
221, 275, 285, 312, 359, 365

Williams, Frederick B.
275

Wilson, Robert H.
347

Wilson, Bethel
113

Wilson, Donald R. “Bud”
347

Wilson, Doris I. (Cooley)
159, 198, 343

Wilson, H. Elizabeth (Compton)
347

Wilson, Ellsworth E. “Socky”
27, 159, 171, 198, 343, 344

Wilson, Gretchen J. (Dixon)
51

Wilson, Howard E.
51

Wilson, Juanita Suzanne
198

Wilson, Lida M.
11, 24

Wilson, Michael E.
159

Willson, R. Meredith
265

Wimple, Mr.
194

Woodruff, M. Joe
45, 65, 79, 113, 120

Wood, Kenneth
365

Yagerline, Jewell E. (Ratcliff)
192, 386

Yegerlehner, Clarence
64, 129, 132, 134, 232, 306

Yegerlehner, Earl
69, 213

Yegerlehner, Esther M. (Zurcher)
109

Yegerlehner, Floyd
3–4, 25, 46, 54, 59, 68, 69, 74, 79, 95, 98, 108, 123, 144, 151, 158, 161, 184–85, 206, 213, 215, 232, 242, 254, 261, 265, 287, 306, 324, 337, 342, 345, 347, 350, 364

Yegerlehner, John H.
3, 24, 43, 52, 72, 97, 128, 153, 158, 183, 215, 218, 230, 232, 243, 265, 280, 291, 312, 317, 341, 342

Yegerlehner, Lovina (Schiele)
3, 24, 43, 52, 54, 64, 68, 72, 97, 101, 109, 127, 128, 129, 132, 141, 146, 153, 156, 158, 162, 181, 183, 185, 195, 199, 206, 213, 215, 218, 220, 222, 223, 225, 230, 232, 239–40, 243, 255, 259, 265, 269, 279–80, 282, 284, 291, 302, 312, 317, 324, 326, 328, 341, 342, 343, 347, 358

Yegerlehner, Paul
69, 213

Yegerlehner, Ralph
232, 306

Yegerlehner, Samuel A.
213, 232, 306, 338

Yegerlehner, Ruth (Salter)
3–4, 25, 46, 54, 59, 68, 69, 74, 79, 81, 91, 95, 98, 101, 109, 116, 123, 151, 158, 161, 184, 206, 207, 213, 215, 242, 254, 256, 261, 265, 280, 284, 287, 324, 326, 328, 337, 342, 343, 345, 347, 364

Yost, Leo J. “Pete”
116, 121

Zell
163, 171, 272, 311, 342, 359, 364

Zell, Elizabeth A.
111, 154, 230, 255–56

Zell, Martha J.
230

Zell, Norma (Hibbs)
20, 25, 45, 144, 159, 181, 255–56, 272, 329, 351

Zell, Russell L.
54, 65, 108, 120, 177, 181, 185, 206, 213, 230, 256, 266, 309, 351, 364

Zell, Virginia M.
111, 154, 230, 255

Ziemer, Gregor
191

Zumbrum, Mrs.
264

—, Abigail (Dr. Fred M. Williams’ aunt)
295

—, Cracker
214

—, Ella
168

—, Hannah
325

—, Nellie
271, 280

—, Thelma
52

© 2016 copyright owned by Deborah Sweeney

 

Monthly Update – March 2016

It is hard to believe that March is almost over. I have so much I am trying to accomplish right now. I am currently on spring break from school, and I am hoping to get a long list of things done by the end of the week. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that I get through the top few items on my list.

The WWII Project

Hollinger boxesThe Letters

During last month I have published many letters that were not written by Roscoe and Gladys. These letters were written between June 1944 and August 1945. Over this fourteenth month period, Roscoe, Gladys and the boys were living together in Liberty, Missouri. Roscoe was attached to William Jewell College’s Naval Flight Preparatory School.  His responsibilities included treating the officers and their families, as well as the soldiers attending the flight school. In August 1945, he was given orders to report to a new assignment on the west coast. To put this change of duty into historical perspective, Roscoe traveled to San Francisco days after the bombs were dropped on Japan and their inevitable surrender. Look for the letters between Roscoe and Gladys to resume the first week in April.

I have taken the next step in my preservation process. I have purchased some Hollinger boxes and heavy weight archival folders. Once I knock a few things off the top of my to-do list, I plan on moving the letters out of their plastic sheets and three ring binders. While working on the blog and books, it was definitely easier to store the letters in binders. However, this is not necessarily the best method for conserving them. I will start with the letters already published in Dear Mother, Love Daddy. I already have a basic finding aid prepared for cataloging the letters.

Dear Mother, Love Daddy

Unfortunately, I was not chosen as one of the local authors to participate in the Local Author Festival at the Sacramento library in April. I am definitely disappointed but not discouraged. If you have read the book, please leave a review on Goodreads or Amazon. The more reviews the book gets, the higher ranking it gets (and more likely it is to be highlighted by Amazon’s algorithms).

Lots of Love, Daddy coverLots of Love, Daddy

This month has been a huge push for me to get the manuscript prepared to turn over to my copy editor. I finally finished the index, and am currently working on the glossary of people. Then all that I have left is to write my author’s notes and acknowledgements, a list of illustrations and my biography. My father FINALLY found a envelope with many of the original photographs that I intend to use in this volume. Just in the nick of time! I need to sort through the envelope and re-scan some of these photographs as well as add some new unseen pictures to the book.

This month the preliminary cover for the book was designed! Many, many thanks to Dan Young for doing a stellar job. And so, dear readers, you get the first look!

Genealogy booksSacramento Library

Last weekend I enjoyed meeting with more patrons to assist them with their genealogy puzzles. Although a couple of my appointments were cancelled (we think because people did not realize it was Easter weekend), there were some walk-ins who filled up the empty spots in my schedule. I love exploring other people’s ancestry and seeing what we can find. If you are interested in booking an appointment, contact the Franklin branch.

My next lecture is scheduled for May 7th. I will be talking about some of my favorite free genealogy sites that are available on the Internet. One of those sites is Chronicling America on the Library of Congress’ website. This is a wonderful site for finding free digitized newspapers as well as an awesome finding aid for locating newspapers in repositories around the country.

Certification

I haven’t necessarily done much towards certification this month. However, I did discover that the Holmes County Library has digitized some of the local newspapers, including the Holmes County Farmer. Within minutes of discovering this resource, I located the obituary of an ancestor I am hoping to highlight in my KDP (Kinship-Determination Project). The KDP is usually one of the more extensive requirements of the certification portfolio. The requirement is to “submit a narrative genealogy, narrative lineage, or narrative pedigree that documents and explains linkages among three ancestral generations.”

I have also been thinking a lot about what sources I have and what sources I need to locate. One of my next tasks is to list and analyze the sources I have already accumulated so I can see where some of my gaps might be.  Writing up a research plan for locating the missing documents is also on part of this step.

Alfred M. Dicks and Achilles Dicks affidavit

Alfred M. Dicks affidavit (Image courtesy of FamilySearch.org)

I have been thinking about what a “reasonably exhaustive search” may be for this project, and the other elements of the portfolio. This last month I have made some amazing discoveries in my own research. I have unearthed two documents related to my ancestor Alfred M. Dicks. The main reason I have found these documents now (after 20 years!) is that the collections have recently become available online. Neither document was in an indexed database. I had to search for hours in order to find them. I wonder what other documents I could find, if only, I could make it to the courthouse or local library myself. I have been unable to find a reliable researcher willing to take on this research for me, nor would my bank account be able to support the hourly fees. This rural county has a population of less than 20,000 people. My own small city has more than 7 times that amount. So when is a “reasonably exhaustive search” complete? I don’t have a good answer to this question. I worry that I won’t have done enough when it is time to submit my portfolio. The converse is, if you don’t stop at some point to write down what you have found, no one will know what you have discovered, and it may be lost again.

Jamboree

It is a little over two months before Jamboree. I was really hoping to see one of the sample BCG portfolios last year in the exhibition hall. There wasn’t even BCG booth! Because I am so much closer to wanting to start the certification process, I emailed the BCG this week. I received confirmation that the sample portfolios will be there. Have you checked out a BCG portfolio at a genealogy conference? I can’t wait to see one (to see whether my work is at that level or not).

Until next month! Happy hunting!

© 2016 Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/30/monthly-update-march-2016/

Letters to My Children – Star Wars

Letters to My ChildrenThis is an occasional series in which I recollect my own memories and attempt to share them with my children (or whomever will listen!). For more information about the purpose and scope of this series, read my introductory post.

November 2015

Dear Sea Turtle and Penguin,

It is a cloudy and wet Saturday. In many ways, the rain is a boon that we are all enjoying as it has been dry for months. California is experiencing a drought of epic proportions. Autumn has finally begun in Northern California. The temperature is dropping and we have turned our clocks back for the winter. When you are older, you may remember the years of the drought. But this weekend, as we are stuck inside, between laundry, grocery shopping, and other chores, we watched two of the original Star Wars movies: Star Wars and the Empire Strikes Back. We are just over a month away from the release of the newest chapter in the franchise – The Force Awakens. But today, as we engaged in our typical banter over unrealistic plot points, we discussed which characters were puppets (Yoda), inhabited by dwarves (Jawas/R2D2), or giants (Chewbacca). I lectured over the CGI effects which were added into the digitally re-mastered versions from the 1990s. Sea Turtle, you are much like me in my love of fantasy books and films/shows, but you have never bought into the Star Wars hype. I feel that I have failed in passing on my nerdy ways to you in this respect. Penguin, I love that you are enjoying the Star Wars universe. Your Uncle J was almost your age when the first Star Wars movie came out in 1977 so it is wonderful to watch your joyful energy as you take in the stories.

Today, in 2015, the Stars Wars universe is almost 40 years old. It is already a firmly established part of popular culture. But I remember a world where Star Wars did not exist, even for a brief time. Up until then, science fiction shows like Star Trek and Doctor Who had limited special effects. We laugh at how pathetic those special effects seem today. Star Wars was a whole new ball game in 1977. People lined up around the corner of movie theatres to see the next showing. They also went back, again and again.

The Empire Strikes Back came out in 1980. Of the three original Star Wars films, I think this one is my favorite. There was a lot of anticipation in the three years between the first two movies, but even more so between the Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. The last film was released in 1983. In the 1990s, George Lucas digitally re-mastered the three films, adding CGI effects that had not been possible only a decade or two previously. Your dad and I went to see these “new” old films together, as well as, the three new movies that comprised the prequel trilogy: The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith. I shall refrain from giving my opinion on these three movies.

David with Deborah, circa 1978, Mt. Wachusett

David with Deborah, circa 1978, Mt. Wachusett

Star Wars became part of popular culture and it hasn’t really ever gone away. Uncle J and I had the soundtrack to the movie which we played over and over again. Our favorite piece was the background music for the cantina in Mos Eisley. We loved to listen to it on the record player. We owned Star Wars themed t-shirts, toys, sheets, legos and so on. Even today we have Star Wars items around the house from Han Solo (frozen in carbonite) ice cube trays to the Darth Vader mask and light saber toys. And, of course, we have all the movies in our DVD library. For Christmas this year, I am fairly certain there will be at least one Star Wars themed present.

Memory is a funny thing. When the first Star Wars movie came out in 1977, many of the big fast food chains sold drinking glasses. They had colorful decals on the outside with cartoons or other popular characters. In July 1977, a few weeks after Star Wars was released, McDonald’s was investigated by the FDA for having too much lead in the decals on their glasses. Uncle J and I owned several of these glasses and they were thrown away as a precaution. We loved those glasses and like typical children we were devastated. In my mind, those glasses were Star Wars themed. However, after examining several old newspapers, it does not seem possible that the glasses were Star Wars after all. Burger King won the bidding for the Star Wars franchise and began selling glasses in 1980.

McDonald's glasses

The Berkshire Eagle, 9 July 1977, p. 1, col. 1-2. Image courtesy of Newspapers.com

I am looking forward to seeing the new movie in a few weeks. The anticipation for this movie is incredible, especially after seeing many of the trailers over the last few months. The original stars (Carrie Fisher, Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford) will have parts in the new movie and that brings back quite the feeling of nostalgia of a time long, long ago…

I hope you enjoy the new movie,
Love,
Mom

Genealogy Tip:

When interviewing a family member, bear in mind that memories are fallible. Record what they remember, but do some research. Can their memories be backed up with contemporary sources? Until I tried to find evidence about the glasses that were thrown away in 1977, I firmly believed that they were Star Wars themed. Now, I’m not so sure….

©2015 Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/11/11/letters-to-my-children-star-wars/

Weekly Update – March 15, 2015

I thought I would try writing about some events, happenings, accomplishments, etc., that are occurring in my little portion of the genealogy world this week.

Dear Mother, Love Daddy coverIn the world of Dear Mother, Love Daddy:

Currently, there is a book giveaway running on Goodreads which will last until the end of the month. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25099832-dear-mother-love-daddy

If you are interested in purchasing an autographed copy of the book, I am selling copies. The cost is $21. The price includes one book, one autograph, and priority mail shipping within the U.S. Please contact me through the contact page/form tab if you are interested. The book is still available on Amazon.com. Follow the link on the right hand side of the blog to purchase directly from Amazon.

Professional Genealogy by Elizabeth Shown Mills

In my professional learning:

This month is the last month of the Professional Genealogy (ProGen) program for me. I have spent the last 19 months working hard to better my genealogy skills. I recommend the program highly to anyone who is interested in taking the next step in their own learning. New groups form every few months. Study groups have roughly 6-10 members with a credentialed genealogist mentoring each group. After 19 months, I have made some wonderful friends and increased my network in this small professional community.

I’m looking forward to taking a “small” break and then I’m thinking of signing up for a couple home study courses through the National Genealogy Society. The online course titled Researching Your American Revolution Ancestor sounds interesting. I have many Revolutionary War ancestors and I want to make sure I am finding all the relevant documents.

Pinterest:

I’m continuing to pin some boards related to my research and specific blog posts. Since I no longer have my archives listed on the right side of the blog page screen, Pinterest is a great way to see some of the older posts. I’ve also created boards for a couple of the Indiana counties where my ancestors lived, a board with links to my ancestors’ graves, and a board with photographs of locations that are featured in the book Dear Mother, Love Daddy. Two boards that get the most traffic are Lena’s Postcards and 19th Century Fashion. My first career was in theatrical costume design. I loved researching historical costumes. In genealogy, this has been a very helpful skill for researching and dating old photographs.
https://www.pinterest.com/GenealogyLadyCA/lenas-postcards/

Upcoming Events:

Next weekend, I am attending the spring seminar of my local genealogy society, the Sacramento Root Cellar. D. Joshua Taylor, who is probably best known at present for his work on Genealogy Road Show, will be the keynote speaker.

In June, I will be attending my first official genealogy conference, the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree.  I have signed up for two workshops with Dr. Thomas W. Jones and Judy G. Russell. I am pretty excited that I will finally be able to meet these two genealogy rock stars in person. You may have noticed that there is a new badge on the side of the blog. By displaying the Jamboree blogger badge, I will be an honorary blogger for this event.

Until next week!

Blogger badge-blogger-1

 

©2015 copyright by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/03/15/weekly-update-march-15-2015/

Book Update – Book Giveaway!

Dear Mother, Love Daddy coverThe book will officially be published on March 3rd so I am counting down the days until it’s release.

What I’m doing:
Now that the proof has arrived I have to go over it to make sure the manuscript printed correctly. I’ve already noticed that some of my page numbers are not the right font. I’ve noticed a couple errors on the cover and have submitted those to my cover artist.

What you can do:
Enter the giveaway contest! Here are the rules:
1. Go to the Dear Mother, Love Daddy Event page (on Facebook see link below) and check off that you are “attending.”
2. Leave a comment on the Event page. You can say hi, or you can tell me why you think you should get a free, autographed copy of the book.
3. Share the Event page on your Facebook page! (This is the most important step!)

On March 3rd, I will chose three random people to win an autographed copy of the book. I will announce the winners throughout the day on March 3rd! Disclosure: It will take a few weeks for your copy to arrive so be patient!