Book Preview

Dear Mother, Love Daddy coverTwo more days until the book giveaway! While everyone is waiting here is another preview from Dear Mother, Love Daddy from the first chapter – Introduction:

During World War II, Roscoe Yegerlehner and his wife, Gladys, began and continued an incredible daily correspondence. Gladys was meticulous about saving every letter that Roscoe wrote. She even managed to save several of the letters that he wrote to their boys. It is somewhat amazing that any of those letters survived, considering that the recipients were 10 and 12 years old in 1942. At the beginning of Roscoe’s service, when he was stationed at the Naval Training Station, Norfolk, Virginia, Roscoe did not save Gladys’ letters. He threw them away after he read them. After he was shipped out to the Pacific, the letters meant much more to him; they became his lifeline home. He kept them and brought them home to Kentland.

Some of the letters were lost. For example, some of letters that Gladys wrote during the month of September 1942 were never delivered. Roscoe had just been assigned to a new post. Those letters were probably lost by the Post Office, misdirected by the Navy, or destroyed while traveling on a transport vessel. Luckily, the vast majority of the letters did survive. In fact, about one thousand letters written between May 1942 and May 1944 still exist today.

After the war, Gladys organized the letters. She sorted them into piles, tied up each bundle with string, and labeled each with the writer’s initials, RSY and GRY. She also included the month in which the letters were written. She packed them away in a box, and stored them in a closet. Many years later, she was cleaning house when her youngest son, David, was visiting. She told him to just put those silly old letters in the trash. Thankfully, David disregarded her instructions and took the letters home with him. Again, the letters were stowed away in a closet, until one day, when David’s daughter became obsessed with genealogy. The letters were packed up in box and shipped across the country. For the next decade, they remained in another closet. And then, finally, the letters came out of their box for the last time. Some of the letters were lost. For example, some of letters that Gladys wrote during the month of September 1942 were never delivered. Roscoe had just been assigned to a new post. Those letters were probably lost by the Post Office, misdirected by the Navy, or destroyed while traveling on a transport vessel. Luckily, the vast majority of the letters did survive. In fact, about one thousand letters written between May 1942 and May 1944 still exist today.

Don’t miss out! Enter the book giveaway here!

 

1 thought on “Book Preview

  1. davidmadison1942

    My instincts as a historian had kicked in pretty early (even before I understood the importance of “contemporary documentation”): “She told him to just put those silly old letters in the trash. Thankfully, David disregarded her instructions and took the letters home with him.” 🙂

    Reply

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