Tag Archives: Minnie (Scofield) Church

Fayette Friday – Eugene B. Scofield, 4 October 1886

Letter transcription:

Meade Center, Kas. Oct. 4, 1886

Sister Lena;

Dear Sister; I have been owing you a letter for some time and will improve the present opportunity. As you will see I am way out here in south western Kansas, am here to preach and am getting along finely, last evening the new Church was full to overflowing and quite an interest is being manifested. Two have been added since we began—a week ago yesterday.

I left home Wednesday morning Sept. 22 at 6 a.m. and was met at the Depot at Bloomington by Minnie, and as the cars were very much crowded I thought best to accept the invitation to remain over night. Thad. has suffered very much for several months with a sore eye. He had his eye ball cut some six months ago. He had gone to work for the first time in months the week I saw him. His children (Lee Roy Excepted) are all doing well. Arther is a model of a young man, and Minnie is a real lady. No one could change more than has El [Eldora].

I staid home with Thad Wednesday night while the rest went to prayer meeting. We had a long talk which

 

[page 2] I enjoyed very much. On Thursday morning I resumed my journey arriving in Kansas City too late for the train west and put up at a hotel for the night. At 10 a.m. I took the train and crossed the State of Kan. by daylight arriving at Dodge City several hours late at 2 a.m. and went to bed. At 8 a.m. I again took up my moving tent and for 9 hours wended my way over the great Buffalo plains of the Southwest arriving at my destination at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Thus you see I made my journey of 1,000 miles mostly by daylight. I had traveled most of the road from New Castle to Bloomington along which there are very few objects of interest, save Wabash River which is lovely this season of the year. On my journey crossed the Wabash, the Illinois, the Mosouri and the Kansas and Arkansas all about the same size. at 2:30 p.m. the 24th I crossed the Great Mississippi River at Louisianna Mo. It is as clear as White Water, and greatly in contrast to the muddy Mo. River.

Kan. has suffered from a drouth this year yet in the eastern part of the state the crops look fair, at least the corn in the field, and out here the corn, oats, millet & cane

[page 3] look very fine. The cattle in all parts of the country are looking well as are the horses and sheep, hogs are a scarce article.

This is one of the finest counties in the State. One year and a half ago there was not a house where the Co. seat now is, now there are 800 or 900 people. A quarter section bought of the U.S. two years ago just north of the present town for $200 is now worth $12,000 and quarters all over the County are ranging from $800 to $3,000 and $800 piece is generally much broken but good pasture land. Keep it in the family—I bought a half section of as fine land as there is in Kan. last Saturday. It is 12 miles out, but that will not affect in 10 years from now, and does not affect it much now. By the help of my friends here I got it at a big bargain from parties auctions to sell, and have just been offered $500 for my bargain—but no. It lies to the south west of here. See map. Please say little about it.

Right here the Buffalo roamed not more than 4 or 5 years ago. I have seen hundreds of prairie-dogs and now and then a Jack-rabbit, as large as a small dog. Deer still

 

[page 4] and few miles west of here the wild-horse.

Well I guess I have told all of interest save it should be about domestic matters. The houses here are all small. In the country most of them are made of sod, and when plastered outside and in are very cozy—but not many are thus finished. The most of the people are industrious and honest. They leave doors unlocked, and are seldom troubled with thieves.

They are chiefly from Indiana, Ill., Ohio and Mo. as named in proportion of numbers.

Give my regards and these presents to Dan. My love to Ella and the Babies and also to Bal. & all.

Lovingly Your Brother
Eugene B. S.

©2018 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2018/02/02/fayette-friday-eugene-b-scofield-4-october-1886/

Fayette Friday – Eudora Scofield, 10 February 1884

Letter transcription:

Bloomington Ill Feb. 10th/84
Miss Lena Scofield
Connersville Ind.

Dear Aunt: This morning I gought be at church, but as I kneed rest I think it is just as proftible to stay home. I go every Sunday when I feel well. I have not missed going before this year. I will try to make the present seem like you was here listening to me talk [so do not ask any questions

[page 2]
until I get through]
I was home first week New Year, mended my clothes and made over a dress & new skirts for a blush basque I wore last winter. The next week, I went to clerk in store with “James.” As [I did not like the other place]. [I was there two weeks, then I stayed home two weeks while trade was dull. I sewed during this time I was from the store and cleaned house, also returned calls and visits I owed—

[page 3]
to friends, but the past week I have been clerk at same place with James [I will stope to give the name of our store is “The Bee Hive.” We handle all kinds dry goods mostly notions. It is one block from “Court house” south and across the street from the P.O. south East.] I will go back again this week, may be off after this week again for two weeks, then after that I will be there permently for spring & summer trade. I like clerking

[page 4]
real well. James is one Head oner of the store, The boss [excuse the expression] which is shortest] said I was best sales lady in store. I sold more goods the first two weeks than any other lady in store. I find my time so taken up sometime I think I can not take time to eat. You know about the meetings of our church through the day on Sunday beside the

[page 5]
mission school in afternoon. I attend so you see how this day is usual spent by me when I am well. On Monday evening is our Teacher’s meeting and Normal class meeting. Wedsday night prayer meeting night. Friday night is Literary & Musical night at Wensleyan University. When I am at the store I stay there on Saterday nights until ten Oclock

[page 6]
you see I only have two nights for myself and take Tuesday nights to do my share ironing. The one night left I have company or go some place, sometimes to Library.
The skating rink here is quite a noted place for amusement. LeRoy Orthur & Minnie & James can skate alone. I have never tried much. I can skate with partner, but not alone. I feel it is spending to much money to skate, for it is so

[page 7]
easly forgotten and often injuries persons more than they rece’d good for a young man died by over heating himself there.
Yesterday the New gas house caught on fire, caused great deal loss of light, but as it happen we had light of old gas. We have also electric light suspended in our streets. That was heary loss in burning of that furniture building in Connersville. I suppose there is many changes made there since

[page 8]
we left. I think though the prittest part of the City there must be the northern now. I read in Connersville paper that J. K. would move soon in his new house, is that true or is he married. I suppose by that he was. How is Will Kliring and Elle [Enyart’s] used to be] how is her baby? is it pretty? I feel real sorry to hear about Jessie V. that she did not do better in

[page 9]
marriage. What Stewart sent his regards to me. was is young George Stewart that married Schull girl? I went to see him at Fowler Ind. where I went to see my friend Tilla L. last summer year ago. I am keeping company with a gent who has attend the Valparaiso school and has met Had. S. I would like to see R. H. S. and other friends I once knew. Do you

[page 10]
ever see Jonnie Curtain and wife? Who did Ed Campel marry? Give my love to Minnie Willes & Florence. I would like to them both. Minnie was so sweet when I knew her. I often think of the time when we eat at school together. I may make a visit among you all this year. If I keep at clerking I want you to speak to Aunt Mary for me and remember me to her. give her my regards and also to Aunt Ella & others

[page 11]
who inquire of me. I hope you are well. I have enjoyed the company of many friends you & I did once go with together that night we were to a party at Cashmer’s for one place, others I kneed not mention, etc. I hope Uncle Sherman will call and spend a week or more with us when he goes west. I do enjoy his letters so much. It did me good to have him come to see us for I did want to see some one from “home.” Why don’t you

[page 12]
go west with him. I would if I were you. For it would be better for you to go away and see the world. enjoy the different scenery of the different land. I expect to go more if health permits. I have made me a beautiful crazy silk cushion and am making a plush one, can you send me two or three small pieces to put in it? I will close to wash the dishes

[top of page 12]
I will close this letter—hoping to hear from you soon. Your Neice.
Eudora R.S.

©2017 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2017/12/08/fayette-friday-eudora-scofield-10-february-1884/

Fayette Friday – Eudora R. Scofield, January 9, 1883

Letter transcription:

Bloomington Ill. Jan 9th 1883.
Miss Lena Scofield
Connersville Ind.

Dear Aunt Lena:

Perhaps you think less of me for not being more prompt in Answering. O! it so hard for me to write any more. I would be pleased to get letter from you every week and I do hope we will commence [?] to do. I write as often to you as any body. I am so home sick all time that I can hardly live. You can see great many changes there I suppose. I wish I could get a look once more of “home,” You

[page 2] ought to see us. I am going to be the smallest. LeRoy & James are so large and Minnie would scare you. She is every way larger than I am. Floy is just as nice & sweet as ever. Little Taddie is waring [wearing] pants and to keep his feet dry—we were forced to buy him rubber boots. “He will coast with neighbor boys,” he is out half time this bitter cold weather, when he is in doors every thing takes tumble—after he leaves house looks like whirl wind had pass through. Then he is quick smart (can sware little) [to much]. He does now not much, but for awhile Ma could not do anything with him, she would call him home and talk to him—he would listen while she talked, then after she thought he would be alright

[page 3] he would look at her and laugh—say same thing over, before he got off porch. O we did have time with him for awhile. He is a pretty child. The boys spoils him. Orthar is growing—He is little [?]fied yet. His dimples stays with him. How did you enjoy Christmas? And you remember the New Years surprise at our house. Now I often think of the beautiful times we have had together. I heard Aunt Ella had baby is it so—If boy name it Frankie—ask [?] Ross why I like the name. Or Wilbur I went with a splendid young man by name “Wilbur May” last winter. I rece’d for Christmas gifts—a silk handkerchief from Mr. S. A book—“Byron’s peoms”—from Mr. K A Christmas card—from Mr. T Also card from one [?] scholars. I have class

[page 4] in Christian school numbering twelve boys. At Mission in after=noon I has six girls. So you see Sunday is laboring day for me also. I clerked at [?] store during Hollidays, and bought me new dress which I finished last Saterday week ago. [casmire skirt and plush basque] Do you ever see R.N.S.? I wish he would write: tell where he is. He got mad. I think over a yellow envelope but he sent me one—[Perhaps through a mistake] but I sent him home back. Never heard of him since. Does J.K. drink yet? Who did Charles Robinson marry? I wish you was near I would divide my New Year’s candy with you. I am making me silk quilt send me piece of your silk dresses the pattern is log cabin (in strips) you know.

[to page 1] I do not know much to tell that would interest you. We are all well. The protracted meeting begin here next week. This week is week of prayer here—This after=noon the meeting was at our church—The people will meet in different churches this week. I went this after=noon. Have some place to go every evening if I could have time to go. LeRoy and Minnie takes music [instrumental] lessons of Miss Wolcott. I could if I would

[top of page 4] but I will not for two Scofield is enough in one family. James goes to night school. Minnie and Floy goes to day school. I did start to study latin but my teacher, had company from Ind and so I would not intrude so I have let it go by. I close with love to you and all inquiring friends.

[top of page 3] Do you ever see Jessie Pennington? She owes me letter tell her. Do you ever see Eva Barnard who does she go with?

[top of page 2] From your Neice,

Eudora R. Scofield

 

 

©2017 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2017/10/27/fayette-friday-eudora-r-scofield-january-9-1883/

Fayette Friday – Eudora Scofield, July 14, 1882

Letter transcription:

Bloomington, Ill. 7/14/82
Miss Lena Scofield
Connersville Ind.

Dear Aunt:

This evening while I have few leisure moments to write I will try to answer your letter, I want you to write oftener for you can tell me more than any other person there. “James” rece’d a letter from Chas. Gilchrist this week – They moving off the Hill makes another great change there. Is Fannie & Conn living in the country yet? I suppose her baby is quite a large boy now.

[page 2] We live in a very pretty place. The porch extend along the front of the house and is high. I am even sitting on tip stelps. The front faces the east. The family are all well and all at the table but me. Minnie is calling me to supper, so I must go. I have eat my supper and made a call and entertained three callers who have just left.—They are now old acquaintances—have known them since the first time I cane in City. Last night—my fellow came, he will leave the city tomorrow—how lonesome I will be—You ought to try to come to see me soon. I think now that I cannot come to see you all very soon. “I would if I could.”

 

[page 3] I’ve have had little Tad picture taken and is just like him. Thaddie is smart—he does not act like a baby three years old—more like a boy twelve. He always his hat on back part his head and he came in the other day in that way—said to Ma [Can I have the can?] Ma said not a word, then he said, [I’ll bring it back!] [I won’t brake it, when I get done with it I’ll bring it back.] He looked so straight at Ma, his eyes were sparkling. We think him a great boy. He must always walks so important. He had to sit three times to get his picture, for when we asked him to look, he would raise on his tip toes. When ever he

[page 4] does anything he ought not too he goes to Ma [says] Ma I want to kiss you. She of course must give up—and laughs. Minnie has grown so much and Floy is taller not so fleshy. James is very tall I can stand under his arm. And Lee is as tall but very heavy large. I feel so small beside them. This is yesterday after-noon I will finish my letter—I got sleepy last night before I could wri finish. I wish you was here to go up town with me. I am so home sick. The teachers institute is going on now. Why can’t you come soon, if you don’t I will die. Sure, it will not cost much and not take

 

[page 5] long to come. Start here at half past Seven and get to Indianapolis at half past Eleven in night—get to rest there one hour before you could start for B. Then arrive here at half past five in morning. I would meet you at Depo—which is only two blocks from where we live. You I know would enjoy the visit we live in a very pleasant place—we have five rooms & kitchen—I am now in “parlor.” I wish I had your picture please send me one. I am going to get mine taken next week. I had mine taken with a friend here but mine is not good so I will not send you one of them. All the boys are working—and Pa. Lee

[page 6] is is commission business for himself. “James” is clerking in Notion & Millinary store, but [?] like any thing at “home” on larger scale. James gets four & half a week. Lee makes sometimes five dollars a day and Pa make four dollars a day and Arthur he has been living in country but came home the “fourth” to day this summer, he is selling paper & now until he can get business to work which pays more. I am going to clerk in fall or soon as I can get a place—All girls work here the Vanbuskirk girls clerk when they can—but now it is dullest time. The girls here which are highly respected and go in best society clerk—clothe themselves and do safe some besides. I live to clerk. Hope

[top of page five] you will write me a letter soon. I want you to give my love to all Pa’s folks and keep a share for yourself. I have not heard from my friends only as you tell me. I would like to see [?]

Yours lovingly
Eudora R. Scofield

[top of page one] I sent two of Thad’s pictures one for Aunt Minnie

©2017 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2017/10/13/fayette-friday-eudora-scofield-july-14-1882/

Fayette Friday – Eudora Scofield #2

Letter transcription:

Bloomington Ill. Nov 28th 79
Miss Lena Scofield
Connersville Ind.

Dear Aunt:—

We enjoyed our ride far as Indianapolis—There we had good rest, But from “there” it was very rough road to travel—The car was warm then cold—Ma took very sick about an hour before we arrived—Pa was in to meet us—went to the Tavern—staid until about ten o’clock—If Pa had staid half hour—

[page 2] longer [Tavern] I would had “fit”—for I had not slept any—until hour before he came with the carriage—then was asleep—They had a time to get me awake & I was sick when I awoke—Well just before I got home was very much better—never saw a more beautiful place—you must not think I am bragging to much—for I never saw many places “you know” But—Connersville is the best place in the winter & how I wish was home, write soon tell all about the weather and every thing—will be of interest to me, but here is no gravel or hills, springs,—all black clay—it has

Eudora’s letter, pages 1 and 4

[page 3] rained last three days—and the mud—have mercy on us if we don’t write as soon as you expect for can not get to the city while it is so wet horses sink not feet—it is worse than sinking in the “Snow Drift.” It was very beautiful here the first two days This is a beautiful place—so many houses around us, all are large two story frame houses. Ours is one of the same—about as far from the raod as your house is—a large veranda in front—an other on the south—extending from the parlor to the kitchen—two front rooms, back there a large

[page 4] dinning room—has seven doors—two windows—I was glad when they were all cleaned back, this room—bed room and kitchen—back the kitchen an other room—with pump [?]—a place to go down celler, which is under all the six rooms, at the left a wood house well I have describe this enough to say, this is a very nice house every thing so handy—closets and wardrobe in every room But the parlor,—the house is painted very nice, If you only could get a crowd to come

Eudora’s letter, pages 2 and 3

[page 5] out to see me I would be fixed—It will be a grand place in the summer time, I like the—place very much—But am so lonesome nearly spoils it all—I can now realize how it is with Aunt—Minnie, try to come out next Spring! There is five suckers south as [brothers] close as Faircer is to Gilchrist—when I speak of suckers—mean those males older than myself An handsome one lives east—he was here yesterday—is going to school in the City—this is his last year at school.

[page 6] Then there are twelve North of here, the city is west—when I find out how many is there will let you know. All these neighbors live close, as you do to Martins’. a Tileing factory is south west—also a brick yard about two equars, what I have seen of the neighbors here, are rich and very nice. A school teacher lives in the second house south. The school house is a mile east from us. But we think sending Arthar & Minnie to school in the City—which will be about a mile and half for them walk. We expect to have Uncle

Eudora’s letter, pages 5 and 8

[page 7] Doc Sunday for dinner. We can hear the Christin Bell ring—beautiful tone. I have not seen any young ladies yet. Tell J. S. poor chance in the west. Hope that he may get one before he starts. You & him can elope with me a week or longer.—plenty room for six or less. I am going to rais chickens. Turkeys, gooses—We have our pigs and cow and Organ. Tell J. S. I am going to rais a Turkey especially for him, Hyatt L. can have all prairie-chicken he wants—You ought to have been here second day the three boys and Pa went out to kill a

[page 8] prairie chicken that was in the Garden I never laugh more—they m[?] it, and LeRoy came in saying he wore Eugene’s boot—instead he had wore out here one Pa’s. Then we all laught until we cryed. I haven’t smiled since until yesterday—you can gues who to, “He is a Daisy” I have not been to the City since I left Sunday. I have wrote this in Haste so please excuse mistakes from your Neice

Eudora R. S.

Eudora’s letter, pages 6 and 7

P.S. if R. H. S. comes back you see him tell him to write—

[top of page 7-8] as he promised if I left Connersville the hours how swifty they past. Goodnight. Give my love to all Aunts, Uncles cousins—and Friends. To yourself especially we are all well at present hope you are the same Amen

[top page 1] I have looked through everything “But was all in rain.”—for my earrings. You have not found them please watch maybe you will see or find them Obige your Neice.

Envelope of Eudora’s letter, addressed to Lena Scofield, her aunt

©2017 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2017/08/18/fayette-friday-eudora-scofield-2/