Tag Archives: letters

Fayette Friday – Eugene B. Scofield, 4 September 1888

Letter transcription:

Rushville Ind. 9.4, 1888

Dear Sister Lena

I received your kind missive on my return home, and presume you received a card from me about the same time.
I am still improving—am very much better able to perambulate than a week ago.
Was at Flatrock Sunday and got along finely.
I do not wonder at Thad’s making Dem. speeches. The Rep. candidate for Pres. is a time-servant of all that is contrary to the interest of a laboring man—has always voted in favor of capital & against labor, and as Thad is a laboring man, & chief among them I am surprised that he had to wait to get to

[page 2] Chinese—“Ah Ben!”—ridden California to get his eyes opened. No! I am not at all surprised.
As for Bro. Chase’s chances I do not like to guess—the outlook is too hazy—Just look—Gov. Hovey—Live-long-friend-of-Saloons L.F. Chase—Friend of all righteousness Treus Lemptke—Leading Brewer of Indiana. Looks like they would catch all on both sides if they can. My opinion is, that the whole Republican Ticket will be defeated in Ind. by from 6,000 to 10,000 votes. Harrison was defeated in 1876 by some 6,000 I do not think him stronger now than then. Besides this the Dem. party is in favor which gives it the advantage. Porter evidently believed this, and when all the Rep.’s in the State wanted him to run for Gov. & were expecting him to do so, he refused without giving a reason, choosing rather to enjoy the pleasures of stump-speaking

[page 3] for a reason, than to suffer the affiction of defeat with his chosen people. He was not like Moses see Heb. 11.25
Beside all this the Prohi’s will cut an interesting figure in the play on the cool day in the month of November.
Bro C. would, I think, serve God better by devoting his excellent powers to the building up of his church, than by running a wild goose chase after no commendable purpose. Over Against all such we read: “Godliness is profitable for all things, having promise of the life that now is & of that which is to come.”
The Rep. party is notorious for breaking of promises—but this year they are afraid to even make promises. I believe they do declare for Local option in Ind. a

[page 4] measure that has been declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of Ind.
I am tired of writing; as I cannot use a pen on account of being nervous.
With Love to all,
You Brother
E.B.

©2018 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2018/02/23/fayette-friday-eugene-b-scofield-4-september-1888/

Fayette Friday – Eugene B. Scofield, 21 November 1887

Letter transcription:

Middletown Ind Nov 21, 1887

Dear Sister Lena:

I am here holding a series of meetings. Commenced Saturday evening under very unfavorable circumstances there being very few in attendance. Last night, however, the house was full. I am using a new fangled pen, and as you see, with varied effect. Am quite well, as was Ettie Saturday when I saw her last.

Desiring to try the metal of a horse I wished to buy I loaded Ettie into a bugy and drove to Summit on Saturday afternoon. Drove six miles, somewhat hilly, in 45 minutes. Drove back after half an hour in same time. Unhitched the horse—ran two squares carried two doz. cans of fruit=a doz. each trip down seller—also a box of onions—packed my valirse—hurried four squares to depot—saw the train moving out but succeeded in stoping it, and was on the cars all in 25 minutes from the time I drove up to Saffles stable.

[page 2]
We expect to move next week. We will pack up and ship our goods on Friday and will go down and have the floors scrubed Saturday—haul in our goods and on Monday Ettie will go down, and in a few day we will be all right.

I was called to Greenfield and preached Thursday & Friday & Sat. evenings to large audiences. Had a very pleasant time. Saw their gass wells and sat by my first gas fires. I will not try to tell of the conveniences of natural gas as you have heard so much about it. There is gas now burning in the grate behind me as write in the pleasant home of Bro. J.P. Shoemaker.

I am in a historic community—this being the home of the family of Franklin’s who have produced so much discord on the organ question. I remain ofer 27th

Enclosed find clipping that will arouse old memories. Place in one of my books after you read it.

With kisses for little ones and love to all I am your Brother E.B.

©2018 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2018/02/16/fayette-friday-eugene-b-scofield-21-november-1887/

Fayette Friday – Eugene B. Scofield, 16 March 1887

Letter transcription:

Spencer, Indiana; March 16, 1887

Dear Sister Lena;

As will see by above date, I am in the city of S. Am assisting Bro. Strawn in a protracted meeting, are having good success, Have had 24 additions to date, with a good prospect for many more. Those gathered in thus far are among the best citizens of Spencer.

We have a good church here, & in fine working order membership 250 or more. Two judges belong – one of them Judge Robinson, an own cousin of George Holten & Jennie Shipley. Judge Robinson was an acquaintance of mother’s. He is a prominent lawyer, & a fine Christian gentleman.

I have never held a series of meetings that have given me such satisfaction as this one. Never have I been able to direct my efforts so much to my satisfaction as in this meeting. We have had crowded house every evening and the interest has been excellent from the first, and still first, and still continues, yet I do not know how long it will be thus.

I am in good heal[th] well situated as for plenty of labor. But must close took dinner with Dr. Wiles—some days ago.

Fraternally, & lovingly, E.B. Scofield

 

©2018 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2018/02/09/fayette-friday-eugene-b-scofield-16-march-1887/

Fayette Friday – Eugene B. Scofield, 4 October 1886

Letter transcription:

Meade Center, Kas. Oct. 4, 1886

Sister Lena;

Dear Sister; I have been owing you a letter for some time and will improve the present opportunity. As you will see I am way out here in south western Kansas, am here to preach and am getting along finely, last evening the new Church was full to overflowing and quite an interest is being manifested. Two have been added since we began—a week ago yesterday.

I left home Wednesday morning Sept. 22 at 6 a.m. and was met at the Depot at Bloomington by Minnie, and as the cars were very much crowded I thought best to accept the invitation to remain over night. Thad. has suffered very much for several months with a sore eye. He had his eye ball cut some six months ago. He had gone to work for the first time in months the week I saw him. His children (Lee Roy Excepted) are all doing well. Arther is a model of a young man, and Minnie is a real lady. No one could change more than has El [Eldora].

I staid home with Thad Wednesday night while the rest went to prayer meeting. We had a long talk which

 

[page 2] I enjoyed very much. On Thursday morning I resumed my journey arriving in Kansas City too late for the train west and put up at a hotel for the night. At 10 a.m. I took the train and crossed the State of Kan. by daylight arriving at Dodge City several hours late at 2 a.m. and went to bed. At 8 a.m. I again took up my moving tent and for 9 hours wended my way over the great Buffalo plains of the Southwest arriving at my destination at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Thus you see I made my journey of 1,000 miles mostly by daylight. I had traveled most of the road from New Castle to Bloomington along which there are very few objects of interest, save Wabash River which is lovely this season of the year. On my journey crossed the Wabash, the Illinois, the Mosouri and the Kansas and Arkansas all about the same size. at 2:30 p.m. the 24th I crossed the Great Mississippi River at Louisianna Mo. It is as clear as White Water, and greatly in contrast to the muddy Mo. River.

Kan. has suffered from a drouth this year yet in the eastern part of the state the crops look fair, at least the corn in the field, and out here the corn, oats, millet & cane

[page 3] look very fine. The cattle in all parts of the country are looking well as are the horses and sheep, hogs are a scarce article.

This is one of the finest counties in the State. One year and a half ago there was not a house where the Co. seat now is, now there are 800 or 900 people. A quarter section bought of the U.S. two years ago just north of the present town for $200 is now worth $12,000 and quarters all over the County are ranging from $800 to $3,000 and $800 piece is generally much broken but good pasture land. Keep it in the family—I bought a half section of as fine land as there is in Kan. last Saturday. It is 12 miles out, but that will not affect in 10 years from now, and does not affect it much now. By the help of my friends here I got it at a big bargain from parties auctions to sell, and have just been offered $500 for my bargain—but no. It lies to the south west of here. See map. Please say little about it.

Right here the Buffalo roamed not more than 4 or 5 years ago. I have seen hundreds of prairie-dogs and now and then a Jack-rabbit, as large as a small dog. Deer still

 

[page 4] and few miles west of here the wild-horse.

Well I guess I have told all of interest save it should be about domestic matters. The houses here are all small. In the country most of them are made of sod, and when plastered outside and in are very cozy—but not many are thus finished. The most of the people are industrious and honest. They leave doors unlocked, and are seldom troubled with thieves.

They are chiefly from Indiana, Ill., Ohio and Mo. as named in proportion of numbers.

Give my regards and these presents to Dan. My love to Ella and the Babies and also to Bal. & all.

Lovingly Your Brother
Eugene B. S.

©2018 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2018/02/02/fayette-friday-eugene-b-scofield-4-october-1886/

Fayette Friday – Fannie L. (Gilchrist) Merrell #2

A second letter from Fannie Gilchrist to Lena Scofield. It is not clear whether this is the first letter or the second, since last week’s letter did not include the year. While this letter describes part of Fannie’s journey to Iowa, it could have been written months afterwards. Fannie becomes a great contemporary witness to the fire that destroyed Chicago in October 1871, as she mentions traveling through a burnt section of the city.

Letter transcription:

Marion, Iowa Dec 14th, 72

Dear Lena

I received your letter and was very glad to hear from you. I thought you was going to wait until I wrote. O! how I wish I could see you and tell you all the news you want me to tell you all about my journey it would have been very pleasant – if I had been well it makes me have the head ach to write on the cars It was in the after noon when we crossed the Mississippi and the sun was shining and it did look so pretty I wish you could of seen it there is an island in it with two houses on it – there was a lady on the cars that told me they was not nice people that lived there. Lake Michigan was so pretty the sun was shining on it – which made it look beautiful. Did you ever see a wind mill? I saw so many of all shapes they did look so funy. On getting off the cars

[page 2] at the great Union Depot at Chicago we had to get in the to go to the well street Depot and going from one Depot to the other we passed through the burnt part of the city. I saw a great many people there was a carrage passed us and I think the women that were in the carriage was Nun’s they did look so funy. I reached the end of my journey between 8 and 9 o’clock I was very tired. I spend my Thanksgiveing at home I was invited out but did not go, Miss Small was here for dinner. Are you making any Christmas presents? Lena pleas tell Em and Min I would like to write to them but have not time I send my love to them. Is Mary there yet? You say you wish I could see Zella I would like to very much. I send my love to Pauline and ask her if she does not want to take a sleigh ride this winter. You want me to tell you all about my school I am acquainted with all of the girls of my size and most all of the large ones I have not had an introduction to any of the boys and I do not want any the boys here are

[page 3] are no better than they are there. I like some of the girls real well. I sit with Alice Cook I think she is a very nice little girl. Alice and I got weighted and I weigh 104 Miss Small think I am flesher than when I first came. I go with Effa Whipple the most of the time she is my cousin she is as large as I but not as old. I have not been to see her but twice since I been here and she does not live far from our house I was over to her house yesterday evening and we had a real nice time she played on the Piano and I sang. Aunt Abbie said I might go to the Literrary so Effa Anna and their Ma called for me and I went with them. We had a real nice time it was at the public school there are three Literrary socities here. Are they going to have a tree Christamas at our church? We were going to have a supper Christamas eve I gues they are going to put it off until the horses get better so the country people can come and then we are going to have a sleigh ride before supper won’t that be nice? I should think

[page 4] Anna Quinn would have been ashamed of her self that piece that was in the Gazette, was she not? What made them put it in? Does Ella Quinn go over to our house? You ask me if I do not think of staying here two years I would like to go to school two years for I think I know very little for a girl of my age. How can they get Mr. Bippetoe when He is superintendant of the College? You ask me if it is so that Emma was going to be married I don’t know what you mean I never said any thin about her going to marry. Lizzie has not answered my letter yet. Have you heard from Ella lately? The wind is blowing real hard to day you ought to hear it – some time I know it would scare you. My new dress is done it is trimed with satten of a darker shade it is made with a polinase buttoned up behind it has three folds on the upper skirt and a ruffle and Miliners fold above that and between the two there is a fold of satten on the lower skirt there is a broad piece of bias satten I think it is very

[top margin] pretty. I am going to wear it tomorrow. You did not tell me what you did on Election day did you ride on the wagon? It was as still as could be here it seemed so funny for it was all ways so noisy there. Next week is examination. I have to learn sum poetry this afternoon for next Friday. I wish you would tell me all about the Rivel Sisters and Bone of Contention Aunt does not take that paper she take the Presbeter. I am readying that story I think it is real interesting. There is some snow on the ground – When you write please tell me what they done with Dickey. Are my flowers growing nice? O! how I wish I could see you. I was invited to a party not long ago Aunt thought I had better not go she said she did not like for me to be out at night and the boys and girls were not as old as I. I found out afterwards that they danced and cut up high. They always have refreshments at parties here. How do you wear your hair

[top margin 2] I cannot [?] mine fit to be seen my [?] teeth are broke and my come is to big. Emma all ways fixes it on Sabbath for me. I send my live to our family tell Ma I will write next week When you write ask me all the questions you want to about my school or anything else I belive I have told you every thing I can think of pleas write soon and pleas excus all mispelled words. I shall look for a letter evry week now from your Friend Fannie L. Gilchrist

P.S. I send my love to all a good part of it for you good by write soon

 

© 2017 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2017/08/11/fayette-friday-fannie-l-gilchrist-merrell-2/

Fayette Friday – Fannie L. (Gilchrist) Merrell #1

During the early 1870s, most likely 1872 or 1873, Fannie Gilchrist moved from Connersville, Indiana, to Marion County, Iowa, with her family. Fannie’s sister Zella has conflicting birth locations in 1872, either in Iowa or Fayette County. While Fannie’s brother Clifford, born in 1873, always claimed Indiana as his birthplace. Regardless, Fannie’s family seems to have moved back and forth between Fayette County and Iowa. Fannie married in Fayette County, in 1877, and remained there until the deaths of her husband and son in the early 1910s. Fannie’s parents moved to Iowa before 1900 and were buried across the border in Kansas.

Lena and Fannie most likely attended school together in Connersville as young girls and teenagers. Born in November 1856, Fannie was about 16 when this letter was written.

 

 

Letter transcription:

Marion Iowa May 30th

Dearest Lena

I thought I would send you a little note with Ma’s letter to let you know that I have not forgotten the nice times we use to have. I hope you will excuse me for not answering your letter, I intend to as soon as possible. O! I want to see you so very much. I am so sleepy I will have to close this long note. P.S. Please excuse paper. From Fannie to dear Lena.

 

 

©2017 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2017/08/04/fayette-friday-fannie-l-gilchrist-merrell-1/

Fellow Men (Roscoe)

Letter transcription:

Lieut. R.S. Yegerlehner
Navy 60
F.P.O. San Fran. Cal.
Oct. 12, 1943

Dear Mother,

I haven’t the slightest idea what is going to be in this letter because I’m a perfect blank but maybe something will turn up so that words will come.

Might just as well discuss the liberal education obtained from association with fellow men. To begin with will take the fellow from Louisiana who in the various discussions describes and boasts of the nice products of his native state. Ask a few questions and he is off discussing seeding, flooding, and harvesting with plenty of “Ah do declare” mixed in with the discourse.

[page 2] The gentleman from Texas who has frequently referred to his ranch and we of course thought it a big cattle ranch but found after more discussion it was a goat ranch. The Gent from Montana innocent like asked him the value of such – was it milk? The Gent from Texas just about blew his top and loudly proclaimed Mohair. So we know there are goats galore in Texas.

The Gent from Montana talks long and loud of the various ranges and dams of that mountainous country. Of how cold it gets in the winter time, the deer hunts and the wild horses.

Back East – The attorney from Baltimore

[page 3] knows everything and doesn’t fail to impress or trys tries to impress the legal phase of things that are and things that will be.

The Gent from Mississippi who knows all about the Navy because he has kept a keen eye on shipping in the immortal river from which the state derived its name or the other way around.

And there are a few from California. It’s just too terrible to smug that fair state by even telling of it to foreigners. That would be using the name in vain but I sometimes wonder about their blessed state.

Nevada has been represented but now that list of paradise

[page 4] is no longer mentioned because the Native sons are back there gathering more data for new assaults on unsuspecting tent or roommates later. They talked so long and loud that their ready supply became exhausted.

With all these discussions no one has been convinced of the advantages of the others native state but at that we do get a bird’s eye view of our own country without travel. Even the Gent from Indiana can’t seem to impress the importance of corn as a plant for human dietary consumption, but corn otherwise is effectively used by every Gent present.

Forgive the impersonal letter. I just had to write something.
Love Daddy

Russell Islands  Image by Kelisi at Wikipedia.com (Wikipedia Commons license)

Russell Islands
Image by Kelisi at Wikipedia.com (Wikipedia Commons license)

©2015 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/04/08/fellow-men-roscoe/