Beach combing (Roscoe)

Letter transcription:

May 22, 1943
Lieut R.S. Yegerlehner USNR
Navy 60 F.P.O. San Fran.

Dear Mother,

I’ve been sitting here for 5 full minutes with pen ready but nothing came so in order to get started I thought I’d give you the setting.

Went shelling again yesterday and had pretty good luck but not as good as day before. It must sound funny that I tell you about beach combing when I’m supposed to be fighting but anyway we still like to pick up shells.

I’m having a little “dohinky”

[page 2] made for Carl Funks baby. I’ll send it to you and you can present it. I don’t know why I’m so worked up about their baby but that is the only announcement I’ve received just like that. Hope David doesn’t feel badly about what I’ve said.

The shells I got are still alive so the inside has to be cleaned out. First we put them in fresh water – That kills the inside then we set them out or bury them and the ants eat the inside. We have to bury them to avoid the stink. All

[page 3] those shells from Noumea where dead and cleaned out when picked up.

The letter I mailed yesterday will probably get there in better time than others because of the circumstances under which it was mailed.

My very good friend whose the initials you note on the letters is now our big boss – was elevated only recently.

Well I did get some written at that so my first 5 minutes weren’t wasted after all.

Love
Daddy

Russell Islands  Image by Kelisi at Wikipedia.com (Wikipedia Commons license)

Russell Islands
Image by Kelisi at Wikipedia.com (Wikipedia Commons license)

©2014 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2014/06/27/beach-combing-roscoe/

1 thought on “Beach combing (Roscoe)

  1. davidmadison1942

    Well, he really didn’t give the setting. He talked about what he did the day before.

    “dohinky” I would have spelled it “dohicky” ….but he definitely wrote “dohinky” That was one of his favorite words for an item that you don’t know any name for. I have no idea if that term is common today.

    The first thing that came to mind when I read about collecting shells that were still inhabited: No animals were harmed in the writing of this letter….but they were. Never heard of this before, soaking in fresh water to kill them, then burying.

    Reply

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