Tag Archives: counterfeiting

Schwartz is Released

Schwartz, W. B. - 1909-12-28 (cropped)

SCHWARTZ IS RELEASED

William B. Schwartz, who pleaded guilty to counterfeiting and was sentenced to the Federal prison in 1906 was released Christmas day. His sentence, which had been shortened by good behavior, expired then. Schwartz expects to travel around the country on legal business in the behalf of some of the prisoners at the prison, and will visit his brother on Kelly’s Island in Lake Erie for some time. He expects to return to Indianapolis.

Source:

“Schwartz is Released,” Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana), 28 December 1909, p. 14, col. 4; “Historical Newspaper Collection,” digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 April 2014).

Violations

Schwartz, W. B. - Violations, 1908

Violations:

(1908) Oct 20 – Refusing to work – I told this convict to get a shovel and load cinders, he said he could not do it as he was not able to do anything, he would not try. (Stephenson) P117 Solitary 10 – a.m. Released 7-45 on Oct 22.

This prisoner #5476 W. B. Schwartz has been reported the 2nd time in two days for refusing to do the light kind of work, shoveling cinders in carts. He was taken before Dr. Yohn who states he is able bodied and can do the work.
(signed) F. H. Limon [?] Dpy War-

(1908) Oct 19 Refusing to do work assigned to him. This man refused to do the only work that I could assign him to and give for his reason that he was not able to do this work (Dellinger) R116 Rep & Ex.

Source:
Violations, William B. Schwartz, Prisoner no. 5476; Inmate Case Files, U. S. Penitentiary, Leavenworth, Kansas, 1895-1931, Record Group 129; National Archives at Kansas City, Missouri.

Lawyer Became Counterfeiter

LAWYER BECAME COUNTERFEITER; IN UNITED STATES PRISON
W. B. Schwartz of Indianapolis, Inventor of Visible Typewriter

His fortune dissipated in an effect to perfect a typewriter which he had invented, and driven to desperation by the need of money to support an insane wife and two grown daughters, William B. Schwartz, a prominent attorney of Indianapolis, Ind., resorted to counterfeiting when his practice failed to bring in a sufficient revenue and now he is in the United States penitentiary to serve four years for counterfeiting. He is 47 years old. He arrived Friday morning with a bunch of convicts from Indianapolis, Ind. Schwartz was arrested last May and put up a pitiful pleas to obtain his freedom, but failed.

The product of Schwartz’s mold consisted chiefly of 50-cent pieces and they were the nearest perfect of any that ever came under the notice of the secret service men in Indiana. For over a year the spurious coins had worried the United States officers, both on account of their being difficult of detection and the trouble in ascertaining their source.

It was by mere chance that suspicion was directed toward Schwartz, bue [but] even then it was a year before the officers were able to obtain convicting evidence against the lawyer. In the meantime, while he had not grown reckless in putting the coins into circulation, the fear of detection had grown less and less, so that, when the officers arrested him in his office as he was bending over his desk engrossed in some legal work, the surprise was so great he gave a shriek, like a wild animal at bay.

His arrest was the culmination of all his woes, and for a moment Schwartz seemed on the verge of losing his reason. When told quietly that indisputable evidence had been obtained against him, there was little difficulty in getting the man to admit his guilt.

Coins in His Office.

A search of his office revealed a number of counterfeit coins, which it was almost impossible to distinguish from genuine. Schwartz had a method of taking away the “newness” by the aid of an electric battery. This he had fitted up at his office and he had just “finished” a run a short time before he was arrested. It was found later that he kept his molds, which were of his own workmanship, at his home where he cast the coins to be finished up at his office.

It is believed that Schwartz did not market his product in Indianapolis, but that he had dealings with large gangs of counterfeiters in other parts of the country.

At one time Schwartz was well-to-do, owned considerable property, had a good law practice and was well known in a wide circle of acquaintances. Then he became interested in typewriters. He conceived the idea of a “visible” machine and, after long labor and much expense, took out a patent and made an effort to market the product. He then found that the machine had many imperfections and drawbacks and he set about removing them. He was of a mechanical turn of mind and spent much time in his workshop. It was while thus engaged that the foundation was laid for his counterfeiting. In making patents for his typewriter he learned the art of making molds and one day one of his workmen jokingly remarked how easy it would be to make molds for counterfeiting coins. The workman showed him just how it could be done and they talked about it for a few minutes and then returned to the work in hand.

His Troubles Grew.

The typewriter business did not prosper, and about this time Schwartz’s wife became mentally deranged. He employed the best physicians he could find and sent her to sanitariums in an endeavor to cure her, and this expense, together with the losses he had sustained on his typewriter and the failure of his practice through inattention, made it necessary for him to give up his home. Still further pressed, he was forced to sell his patent, and it was not long until he did not know from one day’s end to another where the next day’s meals were coming from. It was then he turned to counterfeiting.

Schwartz’s wife is in an asylum and his daughters are crushed by the disgrace and shock of their father’s exposure. One of them said that had they known of his dire need for money they would have helped him in some way, but that he had always provided for them without complaint and that though they knew he had lost heavily in investments, they were not acquainted with his real need. – Leavenworth (Kan.) Times

Source:

“Lawyer Became Counterfeiter; In United States Prison,” Commercial Stamp Trade Journal 16 (January 1907): 7-8; digital images, Google (http://www.google.com : accessed 23 April 2014).

 

Warrant to Marshal

Schwartz, W. B. - Warrant to Marshal coverMarshal’s Criminal Docket No. 4193
No. 6742
DISTRICT COURT U.S.
DISTRICT OF INDIANA
THE UNITED STATES
William B. Schwartz

Warrant to Marshal to Deliver Convict to
United States Penitentiary
At Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Filed Dec 26, 1906
Noble C. Butler, Clerk
Kealing
U.S. Attorney

EXECUTED BY DELIVERING THE
BODY OF THE WITH-IN NAMED DE-
FENDANT TO THE WARDEN OF THE
UNITED STATES PENITENTIARY AT
FORT LEAVENWORTH KANSAS, THIS
14th DAY OF December 1906,
Henry C. Pettit
MARSHAL

Schwartz, W. B. - Warrant to Marshal

United States of America             }

District of Indiana                          } SS:

The President of the United States to the Marshal of said District – Greeting:

WHEREAS, By the judgment of the District court of the United States, in and for said District, at the November Term thereof, on the 27th day of November, A. D. 1906, William B. Schwartz who before, in said Court, had been convicted of record of the crime of Counterfeiting was sentenced therefor to be imprisoned in the United States Penitentiary at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas for the term of Four (4) years at hard labor and to pay unto the United States a fine of ten Dollars ($10⁰⁰), and the costs of this prosecution, taxes at $ – .

You are therefore hereby commanded to deliver the body of said William B. Schwartz into the custody of the Warden of said Prison, to undergo the execution of said sentence.

WITNESS, the Honorable Albert B. Anderson, Judge of the District Court of the United States, for the District of Indiana, and the seal of said District Court, this 11th day of December A. D. 1906.

Noble C. Butler Clerk.

 

Source:

Warrant to Marshal to Deliver Convict, 26 December 1906; United States vs. William B. Schwartz, case no. 6742; Criminal Case Files, U. S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, 1854-1981; Records of the District Courts of the United States, Record Group 21; National Archives, Chicago, Illinois.

 

On Way To Prison

Schwartz, W. B. - 1906-12-13
ON WAY TO PRISON

GROUP OF CONVICTED MEN STARTED WESTWARD IN MARSHAL’S CHARGE

Eight men sentenced to terms in the United States prison at the last term of the federal court started for that institution at Fort Leavenworth, Kas., Thursday, in charge of United States Marshal H. C. Pettit and Duputies Dave Rankin and Tom Martin, leaving the city at 11:45. The prisoners are William Schwartz, the Indianapolis attorney, sentenced for four years for counterfeiting; John row, one year for making false affidavit as to pension papers; Theodore Linninger, three years, for passing counterfeit coins; Theodore Englebert, of Richmond, one year for taking money from a letter, as an employee of the postoffice; Judson Sturtevant, three years for robbing a postoffice; Alexander Rusilla, one year for counterfeiting; Napoleon B. Livingston, one year for impersonating a government pension officer; Clarence Robertson, one year for forging a money order.

Mrs. Gustave A. Consman, of Terre Haute, true to her husband, who is serving a term in prison for embezzlement, called at the marshal’s office before the officers departed with the prisoners, and entrusted to them a package intended to make her husband’s Christmas brighter.

“On Way to Prison,” Indianapolis Sun (Indianapolis, Indiana), p. 2, col. 6; digital image, Newspaper Archive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 16 April 2014).

United States vs. William B. Schwartz

United States vs. William B. Schwartz Cover

No. 6742
U. S. DISTRICT COURT
November Term, 1906
At Indianapolis
UNITED STATES
vs.
William B. Schwartz,
Indianapolis
INDICTMENT
Counterfeiting
Sec. 5457 & 5458
A TRUE BILL:
Mark Hillsarne
Foreman
Filed Nov 22 1906
Noble C. Butler, Clerk
Joseph B. Kealing
U.S. DISTRICT ATTORNEY
U.S. WITNESSES
T. E. Halls, S.S.O. – Indianapolis
Chauncey A. Manning – ”
Merrill Wilson – “

United States vs. William B. Schwartz, p. 1

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA }
DISTRICT OF INDIANA      } SS:

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF INDIANA.
November Term, A.D. 1906, at Indianapolis.

THE GRAND JURORS OF THE UNITED STATES, Within and for the District of Indiana, impaneled, sworn and charged in said Court, at the term aforesaid, to inquire for the United States, within and for the District of Indiana aforesaid, upon their oath present that William B. Schwartz late of said District, at the District aforesaid, on sixth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand, nine hundred and six, unlawfully, knowingly and feloniously did then and there have in his possession, at the same time, with intent then and there to pass, utter and publish the same as true and genuine, to some person or persons, to the Grand Jurors aforesaid unknown, two similar pieces of falsely made, forged and counterfeited coin, in the likeness and similitude of the silver coin of the United States, which has been coined at the mints of the United States, commonly called a —; and also thirty-eight similar pieces of falsely made, forged and counterfeited coin, in the likeness and similitude of the silver coin of the United States, which has been coined at the mints of the United States, commonly called a half dollar (crossed out) with intent then and there to defraud the said person, or persons, unknown, as aforesaid, to the said Grand Jurors, he, the said William B. Schwartz then and there well knowing the same to be falsely made, forged and counterfeited, contrary to the form of the statute of the United States in such case made and provided, and against the peace and dignity of the United States of America.

United States vs. William B. Schwartz, p. 2

Second COUNT

And the Grand Jurors aforesaid, upon their oath aforesaid, do further charge and present that William B. Schwartz late of the said District, at the District aforesaid, on the first day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand, nine hundred and six unlawfully and feloniously did then and there falsely make, forge and counterfeit, and did cause and procure to be falsely made, forged and counterfeited, and did willingly aid and assist in falsely making, forging and counterfeiting ten similar pieces of falsely made, forged and counterfeited coin in the resemblance and similitude of the silver coin of the United States, which has been coined at the mints of the United States, commonly called a — dollar; and also fifty similar pieces of falsely made, forged and counterfeited coin in the resemblance and similitude of the silver coin of the United States, which has been coined at the mints of the United States, commonly called a half dollar, with intent then and there and therewith to defraud some person, or persons, to the Grand Jurors aforesaid unknown, contrary to the form of the statute of the United States in such case made and provided, and against the peace and dignity of the United States of America.

Joseph B. Keating
U.S. Attorney

SOURCE:

Indictment Counterfeiting, 22 November 1906; United States vs. William B. Schwartz, case no. 6742; Criminal Case Files, U. S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, 1854-1981; Records of the District Courts of the United States, Record Group 21; National Archives, Chicago, Illinois.

Lawyer A Counterfeiter

Schwartz, W. B. - 1906-06-20LAWYER A COUNTERFEITER

Says He Made Spurious Coin to Support His Sick Wife.

Indianapolis, Ind. – William B. Schwartz, a member of the Indianapolis bar, was arrested by Federal officers on charge of counterfeiting.

Schwartz confessed to the officers and surrendered the things he used in making the spurious coins. His law practice, he said, did not yield a sufficient income for the support of his sick wife.

“Lawyer A Counterfeiter,” The Abbeville Press and Banner (Abbeville, South Carolina), 20 June 1906, p. 2, col. 2; digital image, Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ : accessed 4 April 2014).