Tag Archives: William Jewell College

Velma Thrailkill

November 13, 1945, p. 1

November 13, 1945, p. 1

Letter transcription:

Mrs. George C. Thrailkill
311 West Kansas Street
Liberty, Missouri

Mrs. Yegerlehner,

I did enjoy your letter and also the one to Sherrill for David. I have thought of answering it many times but did not find the time. We are a little town but still go fast and furious. The other day – I called on Mrs. Ivy on the war Chest. She asked if we had heard from you. Said she missed you so much, the other people were too quiet. We still miss you all. I would like to hear David tell me to “button my lip.”

It is almost Thanksgiving again and Christmas will be here before we know it.

Do hope Dr. is back in Kentland. At least a few of the medical men seem to be getting out. Liberty is getting its share of discharges. There is

November 13, 1945, p. 2

November 13, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] a list in the paper every week of the ones discharged and it grows fast.

Sherrill is doing well in school. She is taking Latin and Algebra and seems to like both. She still misses your family a lot.

The Russell youngsters are back in school at K.U. According to Mrs. Russell, Richard is doing much better this year than he did last year.

I know you will remember my nephew, Jack Roorback. He came home from Corpus Christi last week on a short leave and married Reba Buckhardt last Sunday evening at Antioch church. I had some bad moments but guess we have to make the best of it. They are both just 19. He left

November 13, 1945, p. 3

November 13, 1945, p. 3

[page 3] last Thursday p.m. for Corpus again. She will finish this term at Jewell but imagine she will go down with him after that.

Mr. Reppert is still in Manila. According to Mrs. R. he will not have enough points to get out until next June. She is feeling pretty blue about it, I think.

This past week we have had loyalty calls among the members of the Methodist church. This was family Sunday and believe it or not the church was practically filled. We had a grand crowd. A full chair too.

It is announced that Dr. Schumacher and family are returning

November 13, 1945, p. 4

November 13, 1945, p. 4

[page 4] to Liberty the first of December. He will be discharged.

John will probably remember Miss Nickerson at school. Her “young man” returned a few weeks ago and they were recently married. Mrs. Joy’s husband has returned to the States. He is a dentist and was stationed at Australia for some time.

George is at the Veteran’s Hospital at Excelsior Springs 5 days a week as Contact Representative for the Veteran’s Administration. He likes it fine.

Write again when you can. We all enjoy hearing from you and your family.

Sincerely,
Velma Thrailkill

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/07/16/velma-thrailkill/

Officer of the Day (Roscoe)

October 2, 1945 envelope

October 2, 1945 envelope

Letter transcription:

October 2, 1945, p. 1

October 2, 1945, p. 1

2 Oct. 45

Dear Mother,

This is my day for the duty. So far it has been assigned to me six times and of the 6 I’ve only had to take it 2 times. Drafts came up or something so unless something comes up in the next 45 min. I’ll have to go on.

Yesterday a slip came out for us to fill out as to length of service, age, dependencies, overseas, etc., and number of points. So maybe something will come of it. Things like that are always encouraging. It is my firm belief that I will be out of this before Christmas. That seems a distance away but I do think it is true. Maybe I’m psychic.

There is no new news on a draft. In fact right now the patients are low so I doubt if there is enough for a draft. I’m afraid you may have had something wrong. You sorta expected the draft to come on a weekend. That was just a happen so the last time. It was really nice that it happened that way but I’m afraid that won’t work that way again. I still keep remembering the wonderful few days we had together and how I would enjoy another just like it. Memories like that are really something to live over and over again but new experiences are better

October 2, 1945, p. 2

October 2, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] so maybe anticipating the next meeting will have some little corner which will make time pass a little faster and easier.

Cmd. Howell, Stanich and I were going out to have a dinner together tonight but due to the fact that I caught the duty we had to put it off. The last time it was put off because I caught the draft home and then Geo. W. was in on it. I suppose by the next time Stanich will be gone. It seems we have a hard time getting together. I see or talk with them on the phone but we can’t seem to get together.

There is an opera again Friday night and we are trying to get tickets. The last fellow who was going with me last time has been detached but there is another here who wants to go.

Seems from your letter that the old Wm. Jewell is closing. I’m glad in a way we got out because that would have changed the boys school program, etc.

Well Dearie it is about my O.D. time so lots of Love
Daddy

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/06/23/officer-of-the-day-roscoe/

Mrs. Jane Van Syoc

September 25, 1945 envelope

September 25, 1945 envelope

Letter transcription:

September 25, 1945, p. 1

September 25, 1945, p. 1

September 25, 1945

Dear Gladys,

The last two days have been cloudy ones with occasional showers – good ones to be indoors catching up on letter-writing and packing. Yes, we’re packing and hoping to return home by the middle of October.

All the officers here have enough points for discharge with the exception of Captain. The school is to be decommissioned in December so all of them should be civilians by the beginning of next year. Van, however, has applied for discharge since he’d like to enroll the first semester at college. How soon does Dr. expect to be discharged; he surely has accumulated enough points?

For the last few Sundays the officers and wives have eaten their Sunday dinners at school. It seems pretty fine not to have to prepare food on such hot days. You are fortunate to have boys who are interested in cooking. Having good cooking

September 25, 1945, p. 2

September 25, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] equipment makes it more enticing too. I’ll certainly be glad to bake again with an oven with a thermometer.

John is surely active in school – there aren’t many musical functions in which he isn’t taking part, are there? It looks as if Mark might be following in his footsteps. Did David miss them when they started school? He has his little friends probably to keep him occupied though.

Van and I went in to K.C. Saturday to see the football game between Kansas U. and Texas Christian. Kansas U. didn’t have much of a show – they didn’t even score so it was rather one-sided. The weather was much more suited to baseball. Most of the men were in shirt sleeves and the women who wore coats soon took them off.

In the last two weeks I’ve done a bit of sewing. I have a light weight wool jumper and cotton dress made. There are several “little things” which are on the way to completion. I have a set including a sacque, kimono, gown and Gertrude which

September 25, 1945, p. 3

September 25, 1945, p. 3

[page 3] I’m embroidering and making a crocheted border on each.

Van says to say “hello” and would like to hear about Dr. so write when you can. Perhaps our next letter should be sent to: 441 Balch St., Kalamazoo 33, Mich.

Sincerely,

Jane

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney

Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/06/08/mrs-jane-van-syoc/

H. I. Hester

August 3, 1945

August 3, 1945

Letter transcripton:

August 3, 1945
Dr. R. S. Yegerlehner
324 West Kansas St.
Liberty, Missouri

Dear Dr. Yegerlehner:

It is with sincere regret that I have learned of your being transferred from our Navy school to another service. I should like for you to know how much we appreciate the exceptionally fine service you have rendered here on the campus. You have done your work quietly and pleasantly. I think it has been an exceptional contribution you have made. You have been so cooperative and helpful in your contacts with us.

I have heard from many people expressions of regret that you are leaving the community. You and your family have made a fine place in the life of Liberty and all of us regret to lose you.

I regret that it will not be possible for me to be at the picnic given in your honor tomorrow. An engagement made some weeks ago makes it necessary for me to be in Springfield at that time. Mrs. Hester will be there and will be happy to greet you.

With warmest regards,
Sincerely yours,
H. I. Hester

HIH:MRB

[Editor’s note: H. I. (Hubert Inman) Hester was a Baptist minister. He was a professor of religion at William Jewell College. During Roscoe’s time in Liberty, Rev. Hester was the vice chancellor of the college. For more information on H. I. Hester, click here for his obituary. An excerpt of “the Tatler” with Dr. Hester’s photograph, click here. ]

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/04/04/h-i-hester/

George Wingfield Asks for Advice

[Editor’s Note: George Wingfield, Jr., was the son of George Wingfield, one of the wealthiest men of Reno, Nevada, in the early 20th century. George Sr. owned several mines, hotels and other financial interests in northern Nevada. His son, George Jr. enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and eventually ended up in the Russell Islands in the spring of 1943. Roscoe and George shared a tent together for a while. The two men corresponded after their separation. About a half dozen letters of their correspondence survive.]

1944-10-18 (GWJr) envelopeLetter transcription:

1944-10-18 (GWJr)October 12, 1944

Dear Jake,

Thanks for your letter of the 8th; am sure glad to hear that you like the life down there and that your organization is so informal and agreeable. That sure makes a difference.

I think I have a pretty fair idea of my whereabouts when school ends, at least for a month or so. Expect to get order to Naval Air, Alameda, for further assignment. When I get there, the Admiral is going to put me on the first carrier that comes in or keep me until he goes to sea himself within the next 6 months. In any event I’ll be close to home for awhile and should end up with a pretty fair job afloat.

Have a rather difficult problem to work out which I need some friendly and frank medical advice on. Would feel reluctant to talk it over with a strange doctor and would respect your judgment most of the ones I know. Hope you don’t mind and that you will give me good forthright dope. Realize that one like yourself wouldn’t want to be positive on anything of this nature and so if you would care to oblige, I’d of course understand that any advice along this line is dependent on the individual. Anyway here’s the problem: I have been going with a girl back here and am thinking seriously of marrying her. She is 20 and has a history of T.B., having been in a hospital in Arizona four years ago with her right lung infected. She appears to be in good health now except that she is subject to asma and has to live in a dry climate and so she is now living and working out in Arizona. Up until the last month she has been taking treatments of some sort whereby air is injected in the region of the lung someplace by hypodermic. This has been discontinuted. Her last xrays show only a very tiny shaded shot in contrast to what it was once over almost the entire lung. Her lung is functioning. She is normal in weight, in fact a few pounds to the good but she is enemic.

What I want to know before I go too far in this matter is:

  1. Under the circumstances, is this girl apt to be o.k. if watched carefully and if she lived say in Reno where the climate is dry but cold in winter?
  2. Would that climate be o.k. for asma? Is asma hereditary? Tendency to have T.B.?
  3. How big a risk do you think I’d be taking marrying a girl like that, frankly and as my friend?

Yours very truly,
George

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/15/george-wingfield-asks-for-advice/

David’s 23rd Month and Second Birthday

Sometime during the month of August or early September 1944, the Yegerlehner family enjoyed a day at a local lake, or perhaps a trip to the nearby Missouri River.

In late September, David celebrated his second birthday. Gladys wrote about the celebration and his presents in the Baby Book.

David's baby book, September 23, 1944

David’s baby book, September 23, 1944

Liberty, Mo.
Sept. 23 – 1944 –

David’s second birthday – 28 lbs – 35 1/2″ tall

David had a party and received two books from Marylin Moll, sweater from Francis Smith, sweater from Bobby Steinbaugh, Tinker Toys from Mary Lynn Brian, Jeep from Nancy and Jimmy Masek, pull toy (donkey) from Gary Sanders, block from Billy Straup, pull toy from Mrs. Russell, antimated book from Aunt Doroty, books from Mother, Daddy, John & Mark. Airplane from Sheril Thrailkill.

Mother and John made a cake for the party and put two candles on it. Marilyn & Francis blew out the candles for David when they were lighted. All the guests at David’s party were Navy people. All will soon be leaving Liberty, except Mary Lin Brian her mother.

At two years David is quite a big boy – he goes to the toidey by himself. At night he calls when he needs to go and gets out of bed and is in the bathroom before the light is turned on. Still takes an afternoon nap – goes to bed about 8 or 8:30 in the evening.

©2016 Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/13/davids-23rd-month-and-second-birthday/

David’s 22nd Month

Baby Book - July 23, 1944

Baby Book, July 23, 1944

Transcription:

July 23 – 1944

David’s 22nd month – 27 lbs – 34 3/4″ tall

David is learning the words we spell – know when we spell “car.” Has finally learned to drink orange juice. Also likes to sip Coke when we drink one. Says, “Coke” very plainly. We now have a piano for John to practice on and he likes to play on it. John is trying to teach him (David) a beginner’s piece. While I take a sun bath he likes to get a handful of sand and pour on my back.

The Yegerlehner boys, July 1944, Liberty, Missouri

The Yegerlehner boys, July 1944, Liberty, Missouri

The following picture appears courtesy of Gladys’ niece, Gerry. It was originally mailed to Gladys’ brother Glenn in Nevada and remained with his family’s photographs.

 

Baby Book, August 8, 1944

Baby Book, August 8, 1944

Aug. 8 – David started running a temperature on the 10th he started to break out with measles (3  day). By 13th he was over them. Lost a finger nail – got it mashed and after two weeks it started coming loose.

©2016 Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/11/davids-22nd-month/