Tag Archives: Great Lakes Naval Hospital

Leila Roberts

March 26, 1945, p. 1

March 26, 1945, p. 1

Letter transcription:

Mar. 26, 1925 [sic 1945]

Dear Friends:

We speak of you folks often, but letter writing just seems to be one of those things we are forever putting off.

We are still in the same spot and from most reports are fortunate to have what we do for there are so many who just can’t find anything.

Our year is practically up and yours is up so I suppose we can both expect most anything but we’ll just sit tight and hope!

We drove down home last week-end and as usual spent most of our time cleaning, but we at least didn’t find any moths on this visit, but there is always plenty of dirt.

I am at our neighbors tonite staying with their baby while they are in

March 26, 1945, p. 2

March 26, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] Chicago shopping. We trade off once in a while for its next to impossible to hire anyone.

Joe is a “big surgeon” now – he did 40 circumcisions last month! No promotion in view until next summer according to a fairly reliable source for they no vacancies for Commanders at present.

Joe’s Mother asked me for that pair of blue knit pants I let you use for David so she could make some for Adda Mae’s baby. If you happen to have them with you and aren’t using them would you mind sending them, then I’ll return them if David can still wear them.

Commander Kennedy is still at the station.

We’d enjoy hearing from you sometime if you have a spare minute. Hope all are well.
As ever
The Roberts

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/27/leila-roberts/

Update from Robert P. O’Donnell

October 20, 1944 envelope

October 20, 1944 envelope

Letter transcription:

October 20, 1944, p. 1

October 20, 1944, p. 1

Saturday Oct. 20, 1944

Dear Yeggy

I am really ashamed to have not got a line off to you sooner. You might think that the old O’Donnells had forgot you completely. The first day I arrived in here I looked you up in the phone directory for the base and then I found out you had been shifted. You letter was forwarded to us by way of the folks.

We got a letter from Lentz the other day he is still organizing things so he won’t have so many watches. Something tells me that you have the bes set up that way. It seems that I have a night watch every other night. Duty here could be a lot worse than it is, but it’s not like old Silverstream.

Pat is working here on the compound with me. She’s in the recreation building over on the Naval Hospital Side which makes it very convenient for us. We still haven’t got a car – somehow I just can’t pay out to your “landsman” the price they want. You haven’t seen anything good down where you are have you? If you see anything that looks like it’s a buy let me know. Most of these people up here just dust out the car they get from an individual and then charge $250 more than they paid for it.

We have a 3 room kitchenette apartment here in Waukegan that we got with the usual luck of the Irish, the first night in town. I sure hope that regardless of how interesting my job here is, we may be able to stay here, for I could never get anything like this anywhere else for 2X the price.

Since both of us are working we don’t gad about much.

October 20, 1944, p. 2

October 20, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] We play a lot of acey ducie at night and see some shows. We’ve only been in Chicago three times. Getting home to Rockford takes so long via Greyhound bus that we’ve only been out there twice.

Right now I am listening to Dufy’s tavern here at the station. As usual I have the duty. Dotty LaMour is giving the low down on the beautiful tropical islands. I think even Sniveling Jacks in the Tribune has changed the inhabitants of the S.S. isles to scroungy looking natives instead of beauties.

Roberts is still here. Which reminds me. When are you going to be a Lt. Comdr. Not that Robert’s has made it, but you have been a “real” Lt. for 19 months – What next? Also are you planning another south seas trip before this conflict is over? I wish I could give you some word on it. All seem to have got rid of all the Medical officers around here who have never been overseas. Now they are weeding out all those guys who have been overseas less than 18. There seems to be a lot of guys who had a split time over there. 9 months, 12, 10, 6 etc. They were returned for sickness, deaths in the family, or for some other screwy reason.

It’s apparently only a matter of time before they start in to send out men with a full overseas tour. The only thing that will influence this is a very sudden change in the war. We picked up a lot of MOs who had been in some sort of a pool in England. They were there for about 6 months. 5 before the D day and one month after. As soon as the beach head was successful they quickly sent them back to the States with 15 days leave and then sent them to the South Pacific. I imagine there are a lot of guys in Europe with less than 18 months duty. They will all be eligible if things fold in Europe.

October 20, 1944, p. 3

October 20, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] Incidently what do you think of the work they’ve done in the Pacific since you left. If they do as much in the next year as they’ve done in the last we’ll be getting som where.

What have you learned from our great student Lentz? I sure would like to have the 3 of us get together again. Pat talks about it a lot too. But I suppose that someday we’ll be free and able to move around. What kind of post war plans do you have? How about Indiana? I don’t know what I’m going to do for sure. Nevada looks awfully good. I may go out there and try and mine some gold before the depression which is a sure thing for my money.

I cast my ballot for Dewey the other day as a member of the armed services. Sidney H. for my money should be number one man on some beach raid.

Before I forget it I want to thank your better half for that swell letter she wrote the folks saying that Pat and I were coming soon. That’s a long way back and I realize now that you don’t much about our trip.

I came back in a tanker from Wellington leaving there on May 6th and reaching here May 23rd. Pat followed me on the 12th of May and reached San Francisco on June 1st. I landed in San Pedro with Mason, Rutter, and Sherrovk from Silverstream. It took them 5 days to get my orders fixed. On the 6th day I left Pedro and went to S.F. on just a hunch although through a cable sent me by Ed Lentz I knew Pat had left N.Z. by way of Auckland.

October 20, 1944, p. 4

October 20, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] I met Pat’s ship in S.F. and took her off. Criss, Witter and Cathcart were all with her which made the trip a lot of easier for her. Hudgins helped her out a lot to with food as she acts like her husband does when the ground swells start in.

We had a honeymoon in S.F. staying at the Mark Hopkins then came on to Rockford for about 10 days. I had a total leave of 15 days plus travel time. I will always be glad that I talked you into that trip to the South Island.

Well bud, I’m going out and get a coke. Wish I could just run down to your room and have one with you.

Let’s hear from you and not the way I usually do.
Lt. R.P. O’Donnell
414 South Jackson St.
Waukegan,
Illinois

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/17/update-from-robert-p-odonnell/

Postcard #1 (Lentz)

Postmark: July 11, 1944 Great Lakes, Ill.

Addressed to:
Lt. R.S. Yegerlehner
MSUSNR
Naval Training Station
Great Lakes, Ill.
Nav. Flight Prep School
Wm Jewell College
Liberty, Mo.

Hi Ya – Write me and I’ll write you soon as I get 15 day leave or sooner. Am resting a few hours – leave at 2:30 PM. My new address is
U.S. Naval Amm Depot
Fort Mifflin, Pa.
near Phila 20 min. drive from house
Ed Lentz

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/09/postcard-1-lentz/

Hello O’Shaunessy

[Editor’s Note: At this point in the letters, there is no more correspondence between Roscoe and Gladys for 14 months until August 1945. The intervening months can be filled in with letters from fellow officers, family members and former neighbors as well as some Naval documents and periodic entries in David’s baby book. Today’s letter was written by Robert P. O’Donnell, a doctor who served with Roscoe in Wellington, New Zealand, at the Naval Base Hospital #4. Readers may recall that Roscoe wrote of his friend Bob on several occasions, mostly pertaining to his nuptials. This letter features a brief passage written by Bob’s wife Pattie.]

June 14, 1944, p. 1

June 14, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

June 14 – 1944

Hello O’Shaunessy,

Got back to San Pedro on the 23rd of May. Killed some time  in San Pedro until my orders came, and then went to S.F. I got there on June 1st in time to go aboard ship and pick up Pat who had arrived that day by separate ship.

Pat and I were in San Francisco seeing the town until June 6th and then came on here to Rockford where we are dry cleaning everything we own and trying to repair the wear and tear of travel.

I have Great Lakes for duty. Am supposed to report on June 18 plus travel time. I figure that that will

June 14, 1944, p. 2

June 14, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] be June 21 –

Dad and Mother got a swell letter from your wife that helped to pave the way for Pat. I’ll bet you were glad to see the kids again.

Had a letter from the Mayor of Wellington – Comdr. Lentz – He has started home and I think was stuck in Noumea awaiting transportation. I hope we can all get together in Chicago.

I think we’ll stay out here until about the last minute. What is the dope on living quarters? Are we going to be able to get them? If we can’t, can we get hotel accommodations easily for a few days until we have a chance to get quarters? What’s

June 14, 1944, p. 3

June 14, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] the story on gov. quarters – Do they have them?

What kind of duty do you have? Are things in general snafu

In other words – get off your duff and start giving me the word on what gives –

Pat sends her love –
Bob

Lt. R.P. O’Donnell
208 Paris Ave.
Rockford,
Illinois

If you happen to hear of an officer transferring or anything just before I arrive grab onto his apartment

June 14, 1944, p. 4

June 14, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] for me –

Hallo O’Shaunessy –

Is it going to be good to see you again? Please thank your wife for her letter – and we certainly would be grateful if you can help us out on somewhere to rest our weary little heads come nightfall. Incidentally you can see that married life hasn’t improved my old man.

Till we see you in the near future Yeagey –

Pattie

I have a cousin – John E. Kelly who is in boot came at G.L. got there in last week – Look for him if you’re giving shots –

Bob

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/05/hello-oshaunessy/

May 1944

[There are no further letters during the month of May since Gladys and the boys moved to Lake Forest on May 8th. Their stay by the Lake was short-lived however.]

Baby Book - May 23, 1944 summary

Baby book – May 23, 1944

May 23 – 1944

David’s 20th month. 26 1/2 lbs. – 34″ tall

On May 8 we went to Lake Forest to live. There were chickens in the back yard and David put his finger thru the fence and a hen pecked it – He cried but went back and tried to entice the hen again. We took David to the beach and he had lots of fun playing in the sand and throwing rocks in the lake. We had a cottage on the lake near Zion but Daddy was ordered to Liberty, Mo., so we had just one day to play on the beach. David is getting a good coat of tan. He tries to say anything but doesn’t say everything correctly. He acts like he is playing the piano, can point to his nose, ears, eyes, hair, mouth, tummy, feet and where he gets spanked when we ask him to.

Roscoe’s new orders were written on May 26th and delivered on May 30th. He had five days to report to Liberty, Missouri. His new duties were at the Naval Flight Preparatory School at William Jewell College.

© 2016 Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/02/18/may-1944/

No Children Allowed (Roscoe)

May 1, 1944, p. 1

May 1, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

May 2, 1944

Dear Mother,

The letter you wrote of D. accident finally came today – where it was and why I don’t know. It seems that was just like the letters you used to write and wanted them to get there in a hurry.

I thought for a short time this PM I’d have something about a house but it fell thru. It was a furnished home in Libertyville $60.00 per month but the old “Itch boy” that owns it doesn’t want any children in her house – She thought that she could rent it to people without children. I was a little upset when I walked into the ward and the nurse asked me what was troubling me. I told her the lady didn’t want children in the house and she said “well

May 1, 1944, p. 2

May 1, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] why?” and that was a little to much – I told her the baby would “pe” on the bed. That slowed her down and even brought color to her face. Probably to mine also. Hope the lady who owns the house has splinters in her pants and one of them point starboard every time she sits down. Maybe there are other punishments just as bad but I won’t whish wish them on her at present. Dr. Glick put me wise to this house.

I’ve got my leave started on the way and should be able to give you the dope tomorrow night. Joe gets off or rather will take off at noon on Sat. and I’m going to try to do likewise. It may not go thru for 12:00 or for that matter maybe not for

[page 3] 4:30 but we will try.

May 1, 1944, p. 3

May 1, 1944, p. 3

I sent my blue suit to the cleaner today – so had to wear khaki. It was nice and sunny when we got up but it got foggy and cold later but this eve it was pretty nice again. Khaki is a must for me for the next few days until my blues came back, rain or shine.

We are all set to listen to Fibber in about ½ hour. Right now Gabe Heater [1] is about to come on so I’ll just sign off and say will the splinters punch the lady hard enough and often enough –

Love Daddy

[1] Gabriel Heatter was a radio news commentator. During WWII, he was known for his trademark phrase “Good evening, everyone…there is good news tonight.”

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/02/13/no-children-allowed-roscoe/

A Place by the Lakes (Roscoe)

Letter transcription:

May 1-2, 1944, p. 1

May 1-2, 1944, p. 1

5-2-44

Dear Mother,

At least there is something to report – Joe found a house – a small but livable and reasonable enough. All for $48 per month but not furnished. He called Mrs. Roberts and I suppose she will call you before this arrives. They were able to get it by a friend in Wilmette writing to a friend in Lake Bluff and these people had a friend whose brother in law had a house so you see how things go. Maybe something will turn up in that way for us. The lady in Wilmette is still looking for one for us.

I’ve thought of this for us – Maybe we could take a place at the lakes for a couple of

May 1-2, 1944, p. 2

May 1-2, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] weeks – and that would allow us to be together and would also give you some time to look around and if nothing turned up at the end of that time you could go back home – what about that? We can talk of that when I come home this weekend. I haven’t asked as yet but will tomorrow.

Somehow I’ve contracted a cold and using a few hankies but it isn’t bad. It’s turned so warm today. I’ll wear khaki tomorrow for the first time and have my blue cleaned & pressed for the weekend.

Well, I hope I’ll be able to write of house news tomorrow eve –
Love Daddy

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/02/11/a-place-by-the-lakes-roscoe/