Tag Archives: Robert P. O’Donnell

Death of Roosevelt

April 16, 1945 envelope

April 16, 1945 envelope

Letter Transcription:

April 16, 1945, p. 1

April 16, 1945, p. 1

April 16, 45

Dear “Junior” – It is about time you wrote, wondered what was wrong, whether you were transferred, or had another son.

No news from anyone except I see John Willard occasionally, and talk to him about some of officer patients. He is still SOQ. He did get orders to Key West, Fla., but the C.O. went to Wash., D.C., and had them cancelled because John is the only Dr. who knows how to go gastroscopies there. Wally Reese, if you remember, our cribbage partner, is still in Phila. Naval, but doesn’t like it, too many superior Regulars. Had a letter from MacClatchie who is in Brazil – C.O. of Dispensary 150 beds. A letter from Bob O’Donnell, too, but he owes me one from way back. Has Cat Fever Ward – about 20 admissions daily, etc. On every 4th night also.

April 16, 1945, p. 2

April 16, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] Haven’t heard any more from anyone. All are poor writers – but never did expect one from Ralph (Help me) Criss. No news about poor Paul Beard. Heard Buster Hyman was at Portsmouth. One [of] the Marines here was at Bonika.

Had a change of corpsmen – past 4 months, now another [?] picked for X Ray course, 5 mos., he is a chiropractor – big boy 230 lbs and I give him all my colored backaches, pounds hell out of them and they don’t come back. A couple officers – one Hebrew gets it, too. I have a good staff and that makes work more pleasant.

Just finished my ¼ San. Report, and the history of med. activities since war started – Comm. 4 Directive Na Sec Nov. Did you have to do that for your D.M.O.?

April 16, 1945, p. 3

April 16, 1945, p. 3

[page 3] Soon will be a year since you reported for duty – isn’t it? Mine will be Aug. 1. I wonder where we go next. Have a good notion to go to Wash., D.C., visit my sister and get some dope about billets. Our C.O. of Colored Ordnance Batt. left today for Ad. Base (Colored Personnel) today, goes to Guam, I suppose, understand the officer pool is there instead of Pearl Harbor.

Heard from my bro-in-law – Kunming, China; and my nephew, you met him in Norfolk, has been in Burma since last July – he made paratrooper, was injured, now is in Air Cargo something.

Am happy to hear your family is getting along fine and I am sure you are very proud of them all. You know David is my favorite name, and intended to have one someday.

April 16, 1945, p. 4

April 16, 1945, p. 4

[page 4] We had a little bad luck in January, otherwise there would have been one this coming June.

Have been golfing several times, the weather was unusually good. Today it is raining, foggy and miserable, have the heat turned on.

Well, a good man was buried yesterday in spite of the political differences. Comes a time for all of us to be laid away – whether king, middleman or pauper.

Let me hear from you soon, even if a short line.
Regards to Mrs. Y. and family,
Sincerely,
Ed

My Buick is going fine (32,000 miles).

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/28/death-of-roosevelt/

Further News from Lentz

January 14, 1945 envelope

January 14, 1945 envelope

Letter transcription:

January 14, 1945, p. 1

January 14, 1945, p. 1

Sunday Jan. 14, 1945

Dear Yeggie – Just one year ago last nite we made the rounds of the shopping district in Wellington. You took me down because you knew your way around the streets. I remember meeting Billie there and then seeing Howard Witter later – I don’t know whether you remember seeing Howard or not, do you? We stayed with George – didn’t we?

Enjoyed your letter very much and I am glad you had plenty of time to write because it has been so long since I heard from you. Your duties are not so good but there are some worse and some better. When I hear from others I feel that I am not doing so badly here in spite of being on duty every other nite. In fact, you are on call all day & every day, I wouldn’t like the idea of travelling back

January 14, 1945, p. 2

January 14, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] and forth, especially supplying my own transportation. Here, I am my own boss and my – ahem! – assistant as Lt. Cdr. Arrange our hours, as long as one is on duty, daren’t leave the station exposed. I usually let him go home about 9 or 9:30 a.m. or whenever he chooses. He takes over for me on occasional evenings – we seem to be a pair as far as our domestic problems go, implying that we are in the dog houses; I never confided in you but all has not been well for a number of years. So – it could be worse.

“The Shadow” is on while I am writing, so I may get scared, if you see any incoherence then you will know why. I have one of my radios here. In fact, I practically live here – my corpsmen are well trained, the chief had 30 yrs and does all the paper work and is very conscientious. Two Ph. M. had combat duty and one had hosp. training, have 2 colored Ph. Mates or the OB Battalion

January 14, 194,5 p. 3

January 14, 194,5 p. 3

[page 3] All are trustworthy and I find no difficulty – we are like one happy family. We have set up a small galley and the Marines supply us with coffee, etc., so we have occasional meals every day.

Am finishing up that damned annual San. Report – had a lot of new construction, – Battalion barracks, etc., to describe. Must submit it in rough to C.O. of station – he is an old fusspot as I do the monthly reports. Can you beat that? No more monthly reports but the quarterlies will be headaches.

Heard from Frank Olrich a number of times and from Bob O’Donnell recently. He has an average of 23 admissions daily, 125 in ward, duty every 3rd nite. Not so good – all car [?] fevers & pneumonias.

Had a H.R. from Detroit Grosse Point with signed by J.R. Delaney. So he is near home.

Frank said he is on full duty and all are slated to go again – scuttlebutts – His hearing is the same. His boy was operated on for hernia – less than 2 yrs old.

January 14, 1945, p. 4

January 14, 1945, p. 4

[page 4] You know he is at Shoemaker Calif. Ted Anderson is at Parris Island S.C. I haven’t heard from tohers.

My brother is still at Charleston S.C. Asst. Dist. Med Officer – soft job, no nite work or Sundays either. My kid brother – is ferrying planes now, has been all over U.S.A. and Canada & Mexico. Is being shipped to Florida for some short intensive course on Bombers – he was a P-47 pilot 81 missions. My nephew is in Burma – you remember him visiting me when I had the typhoid chill – he was a paratrooper, was injured, fracture leg, int. injuries, etc. – but now is in “air dropping,” cargo plane work in China Burma India area. A brother-in-law, Lt. Col., is Dep. Provost Marshall of some area. Got a letter from him yesterday.

I hear from W. and [?] as good and as well as the mail service goes.
My Xmas was quiet – had a few drinks; spent New Yrs weekend on station.

Well – write when you can – Regards to all the family – Don’t work too hard-
Sincerely,
Ed

[Editor’s Note: To read more about Dr. Lentz, his brothers, and nephew from a contemporary newspaper report, click here.]

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/21/further-news-from-lentz/

News from Lentz

December 20, 1944 envelope

December 20, 1944 envelope

Letter transcription:

December 20, 1944, p. 1

December 20, 1944, p. 1

Dec. 20, 1944
MERRY XMAS

Dear Yeggie

Well – about time I wrote you a few lines. Really haven’t had anything new to tell you, everything is quiet, still 24 on & off, every other weekend.

No word from anyone recently – not even Bob O’Donnell. Did get several letters from N.Z.

Just think – you were down in N.Z. a year ago, perhaps in South Island over the Glazeeewr. Just about a year ago I was ComServPac and boarded the ship Xmas eve with “Want any help Criss” and MacClatchie. In a few weeks, I’ll be celebrating my first trip to Majestic & St. George.

I hear that all is quiet in N.Z. – all the Americans are practically out, a few stragglers as O.W.I., J.P.B., A.R.C.

December 20, 1944, p. 2

December 20, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] get in occasionally. Dammit it would be nice to get down there to do some inventorying.

Our weather is cold & snowy and it was down to 15° last nite. I am not used to it and my feet get cold.

Saw my Brother the other day (Lt. Cd. MC USNR) Ass’t Dist Med Officer, Charleston D.C., lucky son of a gun; he was on a 10 day leave. Won’t get holidays at home, due back in S.C. Thursday this week. The Kid Brother is up near Detroit in a ferrying command now.

My cruise box (Bokis) & sea bag arrived 2 weeks ago, all intact. Lucky! Did you get yours?

Am sorry I didn’t write sooner –
Regards to all the family –
Merry Xmas –
Ed Lentz

WRITE I hear from Frank Olrich occasionally & see John Willard also

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/20/news-from-lentz/

Update from Robert P. O’Donnell

October 20, 1944 envelope

October 20, 1944 envelope

Letter transcription:

October 20, 1944, p. 1

October 20, 1944, p. 1

Saturday Oct. 20, 1944

Dear Yeggy

I am really ashamed to have not got a line off to you sooner. You might think that the old O’Donnells had forgot you completely. The first day I arrived in here I looked you up in the phone directory for the base and then I found out you had been shifted. You letter was forwarded to us by way of the folks.

We got a letter from Lentz the other day he is still organizing things so he won’t have so many watches. Something tells me that you have the bes set up that way. It seems that I have a night watch every other night. Duty here could be a lot worse than it is, but it’s not like old Silverstream.

Pat is working here on the compound with me. She’s in the recreation building over on the Naval Hospital Side which makes it very convenient for us. We still haven’t got a car – somehow I just can’t pay out to your “landsman” the price they want. You haven’t seen anything good down where you are have you? If you see anything that looks like it’s a buy let me know. Most of these people up here just dust out the car they get from an individual and then charge $250 more than they paid for it.

We have a 3 room kitchenette apartment here in Waukegan that we got with the usual luck of the Irish, the first night in town. I sure hope that regardless of how interesting my job here is, we may be able to stay here, for I could never get anything like this anywhere else for 2X the price.

Since both of us are working we don’t gad about much.

October 20, 1944, p. 2

October 20, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] We play a lot of acey ducie at night and see some shows. We’ve only been in Chicago three times. Getting home to Rockford takes so long via Greyhound bus that we’ve only been out there twice.

Right now I am listening to Dufy’s tavern here at the station. As usual I have the duty. Dotty LaMour is giving the low down on the beautiful tropical islands. I think even Sniveling Jacks in the Tribune has changed the inhabitants of the S.S. isles to scroungy looking natives instead of beauties.

Roberts is still here. Which reminds me. When are you going to be a Lt. Comdr. Not that Robert’s has made it, but you have been a “real” Lt. for 19 months – What next? Also are you planning another south seas trip before this conflict is over? I wish I could give you some word on it. All seem to have got rid of all the Medical officers around here who have never been overseas. Now they are weeding out all those guys who have been overseas less than 18. There seems to be a lot of guys who had a split time over there. 9 months, 12, 10, 6 etc. They were returned for sickness, deaths in the family, or for some other screwy reason.

It’s apparently only a matter of time before they start in to send out men with a full overseas tour. The only thing that will influence this is a very sudden change in the war. We picked up a lot of MOs who had been in some sort of a pool in England. They were there for about 6 months. 5 before the D day and one month after. As soon as the beach head was successful they quickly sent them back to the States with 15 days leave and then sent them to the South Pacific. I imagine there are a lot of guys in Europe with less than 18 months duty. They will all be eligible if things fold in Europe.

October 20, 1944, p. 3

October 20, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] Incidently what do you think of the work they’ve done in the Pacific since you left. If they do as much in the next year as they’ve done in the last we’ll be getting som where.

What have you learned from our great student Lentz? I sure would like to have the 3 of us get together again. Pat talks about it a lot too. But I suppose that someday we’ll be free and able to move around. What kind of post war plans do you have? How about Indiana? I don’t know what I’m going to do for sure. Nevada looks awfully good. I may go out there and try and mine some gold before the depression which is a sure thing for my money.

I cast my ballot for Dewey the other day as a member of the armed services. Sidney H. for my money should be number one man on some beach raid.

Before I forget it I want to thank your better half for that swell letter she wrote the folks saying that Pat and I were coming soon. That’s a long way back and I realize now that you don’t much about our trip.

I came back in a tanker from Wellington leaving there on May 6th and reaching here May 23rd. Pat followed me on the 12th of May and reached San Francisco on June 1st. I landed in San Pedro with Mason, Rutter, and Sherrovk from Silverstream. It took them 5 days to get my orders fixed. On the 6th day I left Pedro and went to S.F. on just a hunch although through a cable sent me by Ed Lentz I knew Pat had left N.Z. by way of Auckland.

October 20, 1944, p. 4

October 20, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] I met Pat’s ship in S.F. and took her off. Criss, Witter and Cathcart were all with her which made the trip a lot of easier for her. Hudgins helped her out a lot to with food as she acts like her husband does when the ground swells start in.

We had a honeymoon in S.F. staying at the Mark Hopkins then came on to Rockford for about 10 days. I had a total leave of 15 days plus travel time. I will always be glad that I talked you into that trip to the South Island.

Well bud, I’m going out and get a coke. Wish I could just run down to your room and have one with you.

Let’s hear from you and not the way I usually do.
Lt. R.P. O’Donnell
414 South Jackson St.
Waukegan,
Illinois

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/17/update-from-robert-p-odonnell/

Hello O’Shaunessy

[Editor’s Note: At this point in the letters, there is no more correspondence between Roscoe and Gladys for 14 months until August 1945. The intervening months can be filled in with letters from fellow officers, family members and former neighbors as well as some Naval documents and periodic entries in David’s baby book. Today’s letter was written by Robert P. O’Donnell, a doctor who served with Roscoe in Wellington, New Zealand, at the Naval Base Hospital #4. Readers may recall that Roscoe wrote of his friend Bob on several occasions, mostly pertaining to his nuptials. This letter features a brief passage written by Bob’s wife Pattie.]

June 14, 1944, p. 1

June 14, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

June 14 – 1944

Hello O’Shaunessy,

Got back to San Pedro on the 23rd of May. Killed some time  in San Pedro until my orders came, and then went to S.F. I got there on June 1st in time to go aboard ship and pick up Pat who had arrived that day by separate ship.

Pat and I were in San Francisco seeing the town until June 6th and then came on here to Rockford where we are dry cleaning everything we own and trying to repair the wear and tear of travel.

I have Great Lakes for duty. Am supposed to report on June 18 plus travel time. I figure that that will

June 14, 1944, p. 2

June 14, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] be June 21 –

Dad and Mother got a swell letter from your wife that helped to pave the way for Pat. I’ll bet you were glad to see the kids again.

Had a letter from the Mayor of Wellington – Comdr. Lentz – He has started home and I think was stuck in Noumea awaiting transportation. I hope we can all get together in Chicago.

I think we’ll stay out here until about the last minute. What is the dope on living quarters? Are we going to be able to get them? If we can’t, can we get hotel accommodations easily for a few days until we have a chance to get quarters? What’s

June 14, 1944, p. 3

June 14, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] the story on gov. quarters – Do they have them?

What kind of duty do you have? Are things in general snafu

In other words – get off your duff and start giving me the word on what gives –

Pat sends her love –
Bob

Lt. R.P. O’Donnell
208 Paris Ave.
Rockford,
Illinois

If you happen to hear of an officer transferring or anything just before I arrive grab onto his apartment

June 14, 1944, p. 4

June 14, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] for me –

Hallo O’Shaunessy –

Is it going to be good to see you again? Please thank your wife for her letter – and we certainly would be grateful if you can help us out on somewhere to rest our weary little heads come nightfall. Incidentally you can see that married life hasn’t improved my old man.

Till we see you in the near future Yeagey –

Pattie

I have a cousin – John E. Kelly who is in boot came at G.L. got there in last week – Look for him if you’re giving shots –

Bob

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/03/05/hello-oshaunessy/

O’Shaunnessy (Roscoe)

1944-02-23 (RSY) envelope

February 23, 1944 envelope

February 23, 1944, p. 1

February 23, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

Lieut. R.S. Yegerlehner USNR
USN Base Hosp. #4
Navy 133
F.P.O. San Francisco Calif.
Feb. 23, 1944

Dear Mother,

After having a battle lasting a good five minutes with some huge flies maybe I can write. These flies are the super bomber type, very much like the ones we see around home in the early spring and since screens are unheard of in New Zealand we just have to swat them with newspapers, etc. One can’t rest unless they are downed because they buzz peck on the window, ceiling or bulkhead – well you know how it is.

I didn’t say anything about the pictures by way of explanation but I guess there wasn’t much to say. The overseas cap I had one was borrowed and

February 23, 1944, p. 2

February 23, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] my blue suit looked as if I had slept in it but I hadn’t. It really hadn’t been pressed in a long while. The one picture of myself I thought best was the one when I was sitting in the doorway. Really I think that one flatters me and it doesn’t look too good at that.

I’ve forgotten the name of our show tonite but someone told me it was a story with a setting in a South Sea Isle. That should really be good. I believe it was Rosie. Said he had seen it before he left the states. Possibly I should have explained or maybe I did – Rosie is short for Rosenberg and the latter name speaks for itself but we get along OK, strange as it seems. There are so many Irish people around here that instead of calling me by my real name I have been dubbed O’Shaunnessy and when someone calls out that name I know who they mean,

February 23, 1944, p. 3

February 23, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] some fun wouldn’t you say? I think Bob’s wife started that in the first place with a name like McReynold and O’Donnell she thought that would be more proper. She comes out rather frequently for evening chow but he goes to town of course more frequently.

Later after the show – It was a leak out. Had its beginning in England, its middle in a South Sea Isle. A very beautiful girl on the South Sea Island and that is a downright falsehood. Maybe for those who don’t know it makes good entertainment but I’ve been around some and I know where of I speak, and I might add New Zealand with the Isles. However, I haven’t probed into the inner sanctum sanctorum for beauties but seeing the rank and file of the streets I have seen no prize winners. In fact not none that would even equal you. Is that flattery or what?

February 23, 1944, p. 4

February 23, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] Anyone here over I’d say 25-30 has false choppers. These people are very notorious for their poor teeth and of course they all say it’s due to a lack of minerals but I think it’s the age old custom of tea 4-5 times each day. Always, along with the tea, they have cakes, so you see sweets play a very prominent part and I have a feeling that that starts at a very early age. And of course it is a prenatal habit which must have some bearing on the child.

Just think only 6 more days in Feb. Surely something will come thru before long but several of us have been thinking that for so long now that it has become almost an obsession with us.

Well Dear we will just keep the chin up and know that love will find the way.
Lots of Love
Daddy

P.S. There was no mail today.

New_Zealand_Cities

©2015 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/12/25/oshaunnessy-roscoe/

Death of Rev. McCloud (Gladys)

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 1

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

Kentland Ind.
2-20-44

Dear Daddy –

Another wintry Sunday P.M. I was going to take David out for a walk but a fine snow is coming down – so fine it is almost a rain, so unless it lets up we will stay in or go in the car. I thought we might go out to the greenhouse. Rev. McCloud died yesterday and I would like to send flowers. Rev. McCloud suffered a heart attack last week and I understood he would have to be in bed for sometime but he was up getting his breakfast yesterday morning when he died. As active as he had always been I never thought about him having heart trouble. He used to play tennis every summer –

The snowing stopped so I walked for a while with David & Mark then we came back and went out to the green house and ordered flowers to send to McClouds. Then we stopped at Plummers. Mr. P. was in bed – had been sick with near pneumonia. They won’t get to go to Fla., because they were to go about the time he got sick a week ago, and he isn’t able to be up yet. I think Mrs. P. is rather disappointed because they can’t go. She has been working pretty hard since he has been down, taking care of the chickens, furnace, etc. Then they got a quarter of beef and she canned it. I hadn’t seen her since Christmas eve and didn’t know about Mr. P. being ill. I thought

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 2

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] they would be in Fla., but saw the flowers in the window so knew they were home.

We came back home and listened to the radio all evening. David Diedam came about 7 P.M. and played with Mark a while. Mrs. Z. came over and invited us to eat fried chicken with them tomorrow evening. They have kept chicken in their refrigerator since the middle of Jan. We had baked chicken today that we put in the locker almost a year ago.

Mon. A.M. Yours of Feb. 8 & 9 came today. Had a leak in the upstairs bathroom. Had to call Mr. Monroe – The leak was from the flush box. It had run out on the floor and soaked down on the ceiling in the dining room before I discovered it but it is fixed now and not much damage done. The other side of the dining room ceiling has water marks from the bath tub. I hope to get some painting done this spring & cover the water marks.

It is nice out today. Sun shining and snow melting. I want to take David out after he wakes from his nap. He was a little busy body this morning. Wouldn’t stay put anyplace – just kept going from one thing to another, getting into things he knows he should stay out of. He is beginning to talk more. When he wants to do something to get attention, he gets your picture and says “Da.” He knows he won’t get scolded

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 3

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] for that. He has been saying Ma-Ma the last two days. We are trying to get him to say mother. He can say John & Mark, not quite plain, but we know what he is saying. I have to keep the bathroom door closed (downstairs) to keep him from playing at the lavatory. He climbs up on the clothes hamper and does things.

Irene borrowed some coffee this morning – Said her mother is away but I didn’t ask any questions. I suppose she has gone to Ft. Wayne to stay with Margaret. Irene isn’t working now – Dorothy said Irene was to rest a month before she goes back to work. I can’t imagine Irene staying home and doing hum drum house work. Not that it is that to me – but I am geared differently from Irene. I imagine she will return to the factory.

I have been wondering what the men getting married in foreign lands will do about their wives when they are ordered back to the States. Will Bob be able to bring his bride back with him if he is sent back here before the war is over? He won’t mind staying down there now but what a situation to be ordered back here soon and have to leave his wife. Of course it isn’t any worse than your situation but it would seem a little ironical if he got traveling orders now when that is what you want. I think I hear little David getting awake.

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 4

February 20 & 21, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] I knitted a suit for James L. – I want to get it mailed today. I wanted to send it for his birthday which was in Jan., but I didn’t get it started in time. I made this suit in dark blue. I want to make one for David in red. He still has dark brown hair and his eyes are so dark they almost look black, so he should wear red. D. & Jimmy make a good contrast. Jimmy is so fair and his hair is so blond it is almost white.

–Pause to take D. up and set him on the toidey – it worked – saved a diaper. He is busy now playing with a box – much more interesting than a toy – Toys are something to throw down and leave on the floor while a good box is playing with.

I am afraid this letter has been rather jumbled, but I started on it so many times & I didn’t have a very good train of thoughts any time I started.

I want to start planning flower gardens for spring. I haven’t thought much yet about a vegetable garden. It is nice to have vegetables all summer but almost more work than I care about. If the boys could carry on without my supervision, but they couldn’t last year. John doesn’t like gardening and Mark won’t work consistently unless he has someone with him all the time – It is almost compared to getting blood out of a turnip – except that he can work but doesn’t care to.

Love – Mother

©2015 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2015/12/19/death-of-rev-mccloud-gladys/