Tag Archives: Cocoa Foulkes

Literary Club (Gladys)

October 2, 1945 envelope

October 2, 1945 envelope

Letter transcription:

October 2, 1945, p. 1

October 2, 1945, p. 1

10-2-45

Dear Daddy –

I just wonder if you are on your way home, or if you will be and this letter is being sent without any reason. Well in case you don’t get to the Lakes I think you will want it. I took David and went to Literary Club at Mrs. Tilton’s. It was over by 4 o’clock, then we came home. Dorothy came out with Bobby and visited a while. She said Bobby has a sore throat and wanted to know what to do – I told her it was hard to do anything for a child that young – that had a sore throat.

At Club, I was asked by Mrs. Glick if we were buying out Mathews – they had heard that and Birdie Steele asked me the same thing. I said we were planning to remodel the old office – and knew nothing about the proposed change. Mrs. Glick said Max thought so much of you. Said he spoke very highly of you. He always was friendly, wasn’t he?

October 2, 1945, p. 2

October 2, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] I talked to Mrs. Coaley and she thinks Ellsworth will soon be home. He was transferred at the last minute and didn’t have to go out on the ship he had been assigned to.

Dorothy & Nick are planning to go up to Funk’s lodge Friday until Tuesday. It seems Bill has invited quite a number for this weekend. Dorothy is planning to leave the baby with her mother.

I noted in yesterday’s letter about Clarence Simmons coming to see if you would be interested I going to Mulberry and if so he said they would get you out of the Service – There is no doctor in Mulberry. I told him I didn’t think you would be interested but if so I would let them know.

David still gets up according to the way he did before the time change and it’s too early to suit me. Maybe he will gradually get to sleeping later – (I hope).

Staton’s dog is sick and he acts like he won’t get well. Coco’s brother-in-law is due to arrive somewhere on the coast but he doesn’t know where. He has 57 points.

Love Mother

October 2, 1945, p. 3

October 2, 1945, p. 3

[page 3] Ed has moved across the street so our office is ready to be remodeled.

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/06/22/literary-club-gladys/

The Most Cheerful Letter (Gladys)

September 24, 1945 envelope

September 24, 1945 envelope

Letter transcription:

September 24, 1945, p. 1

September 24, 1945, p. 1

Monday Evening

Dear Daddy –

I just went down and started a fire. It was so warm yesterday we let the fire go out. I cleaned out the ashes so it’s ready for another week, unless we have a cold snap and have to have more fire – in that case it will need cleaning oftener. Hope they get that burner soon. I won’t look for it for two or three weeks yet.

Coco told me that Nate Baer is on the Nevada – that is if it hasn’t arrived yet. Her sister is here now. I don’t know when she is expecting to see him, but soon. Maybe you will get to see him while he is in San F.

Dorothy came out this afternoon to see David’s birthday things. They had to go to Chicago yesterday afternoon so they couldn’t be here for the party. Dorothy says she is going up to visit her mother next week. She is going to take Bobby and stay a week. I told her if I could get someone to stay with J. & M. I would take David and go to San F.,

September 24, 1945, p. 2

September 24, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] but I suppose you would get orders if I did. However if you should get orders to go out I think I would want to. Let’s just hope something is done soon so you will get to come home.

It has been cloudy and rainy all day – not exactly the kind of weather to boost one’s morale – if it happens not to be so high. I suppose it’s the letdown after last week-end and working a little too hard on David’s party.

Tomorrow is club opening at Mrs. Washburn’s. Just hope the weather is a little more on the sunny side. Nelly wanted to sell me a brown hat to wear but I didn’t get brown purse & gloves to go with my suit so I decided to wear my black hat & “things.” I washed my hair this evening and have it pinned down. I think I’ll have to get another perm. This one seems to have lost its pep.

David had a spill this evening and hurt the inside of his mouth. He keeps hitting his teeth. Just hope he doesn’t know them loose. He was up early this morning and wound up like a clock. He told John a wild tale. Today he was playing and talked

September 24, 1945, p. 3

September 24, 1945, p. 3

[page 3] about an imaginary person. It made me think of the way John used to make up names of people he played with. David had to stay in today because of the rain. I tried to take a nap but every time I would drop off to sleep he would bounce up on the couch by me and awaken me. He said he would take a nap too but that didn’t last long.

John said Smith was back in school today but not feeling too chipper. John says he mispronounces so many words. He said some word in particular today and John said he had a notion to correct him (but he didn’t). John is working on Latin tonight. He is really having to dig to catch up with this class, but I think he will make it OK. Mark has been going to bed for the past 20 minutes, but I don’t believe he is in bed yet.

I don’t know what to tell you about the purse. Alligator is very good, but I hate to pay that for a purse. I would like to have a smart looking one, but that is a little high. However, those do run high. Bill brought Arlene a new bag from Chicago. I don’t know what he paid for it but he said

September 24, 1945, p. 4

September 24, 1945, p. 4

[page 4] the one he wanted to get was $35.00. She said she would have had a “fit” if he had paid that much for a purse. I said Mrs. Swarts showed me one for $12.50 she claimed was genuine leather. I said I didn’t believe it at that price, but Arlene argued that we used to buy real leather purses for $2.95 – adding that it was usually the dollar ones we bought. So much for that.

I saw the Mullen bride & groom in town this evening when I went to buy groc. I haven’t seen anything about Joe Bill being discharged, so he must still be in.

Marg Carlson says Eddie is coming back to run the paper so she is retiring. She doesn’t seem to know when Pinkie will be home.

John mailed some letters for me today and Tony said he heard you were coming back. I said he should have asked where he got his information, but John said he told him you would more likely be sent out again.

I am afraid this hasn’t been exactly the most cheerful letter, but I’ll try to do better.
Love Mother

Tues. eve – Just back from club & yours of the 22nd handed to me at the P.O.

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/06/07/the-most-cheerful-letter-gladys/

The Furnace (Gladys)

September 6, 1945 envelope

September 6, 1945 envelope

September 6, 1945, p. 1

September 6, 1945, p. 1

Letter transcription:

9-6-45

Dear Daddy –

The sons one and two are off to school. David is trying to find something to do – I don’t have to look for anything – there is plenty to do, but I am not doing too much. I knitted on Bobby’s snow suit yesterday and got the jacket ready for the sleeves. It was so nice out in yard so after David had his nap we went out and enjoyed the scenery. David plays in the driveway in the rocks. He enjoys that as much as a sand pile. Coco came to see us while we were in the yard. She seemed very glad to see us, and I think she was. They just returned home Tues. evening.

Things are at a stand still on the furnace. The air stopped working and I called Loughridge but couldn’t get Chet. Bun promised to come out and see if he could locate the trouble, but he didn’t come. I called again and he said he was covered up with work and his Dad was out of town. He said to call Monroe or Arnold. I told him since they were going to make the change over I would rather they would come out. I wouldn’t bother with it but I can’t even heat water as it is now. It would click, but the air wouldn’t turn on, so I disconnected the fuse, until someone can look at it. We can get along without hot water until we need to wash.

–Yours of Sept. 2 & 3 came and the regular checks. Also some adv. from Carr Drug, Pit-Morian, M. & R. Dietetic Lab & Sherman. They must think you will soon be back. Hope they are right.

September 6, 1945, p. 2

September 6, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] Norma was going to town so I went along – The stores will be closed this afternoon and I wanted to get a few necessities. Tomorrow school will be out and one of the boys can go if necessary. I banked one ck. and cashed the other. Have to give the boys their allowance so we can get back on schedule.

We haven’t heard anything in the past few days about Navy releases but I think the info in the Chicago Tribune is authentic because it is the same as we heard Sat. on the radio, given out by Adm. Denfield, head of Navy Demobilization. So I think something will be done as soon as it is possible. Dolores said so many changes had to be made over night that it will (may) take a little time to get releases started. However if 11,200 is the goal for Sept. someone should be getting theirs soon. I just scanned over the Democrat and see that John Krull has been discharged. They are getting ready to open their restaurant. Also see the Paul Yost is to be discharged soon. I’ll send the papers to you and you can do your own reading. I think you will enjoy that more.

I just checked the bank statement. Our present bal. with the $170 deposited is $369.27 (plus $47). The Laf. Life will have to be pd. this month or before Oct. 7 but you will send some by then.

I talked to Geo. Tilton about the linoleums this morning and he is going to see about fixing them. They split the place where it is bulged – put in cement and weight it down until it dries, then it should stay – and he says shows no mark.

Lucile just called ma and said she was going to cancel her appointment with Dr. Ade next week. She was to take Jimmy down for allergy tests – he has not been so good the past week and she thinks the trips down and the tests would be too hard on him now – I told her too, to wait a while because Dr. Y would probably have an outfit like that and she could get it done right here. She agreed that it would be much easier.

As you advised me, keep your chin up and I love you,

Mother

P.S. Bun just came out and found the trouble – the wire leading to the air was cut so he fixed it and now I have a fire going and soon will have hot water and burn the garbage. He seemed to think they would soon have the oil burners, so I tried to impress him with the fact that he can’t get it in too soon.

David “Anthy” is still wide awake after being in bed since lunch time and it’s now past 2:30. I think he is not going to sleep at all and I did want him to have a nap since we are to go to Funks for a wiener roast tonite. When anyone asks him where Daddy is he says San Franciko. Coco asked him who was who in our group picture and he was very emphatic about, “my daddy.”

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/05/10/the-furnace-gladys/

Demobilizing the Navy (Gladys)

August 31, 1945 envelope

August 31, 1945 envelope

Letter transcription:

August 31, 1945, p. 1

August 31, 1945, p. 1

8-31-45

Dear Daddy –

We had quite an electrical storm last night and it’s beginning to blow this evening. The lightning and thunder kept me awake until after 2 o’clock. I would just get to sleep, when bang a crash of thunder would awaken me. I felt a little dragged out this a.m. I am sleep now, so think I’ll turn in pretty soon. Lucile called me today and said Jimmy was so bad last night he couldn’t sleep. They were up with him all night. I told her if she wanted to go someplace with him I would keep Karen. She said they would wait now since the season is so near over. I think the people who go away come back about the second week in Sept. Angus is to come back Sept. 8. Lucile had me buy a toy lamb for Jimmy today and I stopped to leave it when we came home. She had all the doors and windows closed and fans going. Jimmy was lying on the studio couch. Karen was raising a howl, but Lucile just lets her howl. She wants her eats when it’s time and it was just past 6 PM. Now John’s glasses are taken care of. He is to get them one day next week. We took David along and he was a little “dinker.” We bought Donnie Funk a birthday gift – and David could hardly wait to take it to him this evening. We missed his birthday by two days but he was very pleased to get something. Little Joy is growing up as rough & tumble as the boys. She is so short – much shorter than David and

August 31, 1945, p. 2

August 31, 1945, p. 2

[page 2] she would run up to David and push him. We measured David & Donnie and David is as tall as Donnie but much lighter. David would soon learn the art of self preservation if he played with those children. They are a lively lot.

The town seems to be going for Bendix laundrys. Nick & Dorothy said they were to get the first and today Arlene says they have one ordered. Bill took Arlene’s washing machine to the Lodge and now she is without one. Coke Foulkes tried to get a B. right after the war started but couldn’t so I suppose she will be ready for one soon. All of those people could have had one when we got ours. In some ways we are smart, eh what?

Mark went with the Washburns to the Fairgrounds this evening for a little while. I suppose they were taking things out for display. John says he doesn’t care to go at all. I don’t either and certainly don’t intend to take David.

John talked to Smith today about changing his course and carrying two solids he wants to take – (Latin instead of Geography). He would have to take Latin every other class & English likewise, because Jr. Latin & Soph. English meet at the same time. Smith said no – John says he knows he could do it. I wish you could have contacted Smith that day you & John went over there. Maybe you could have helped to iron things out. John is going to play the oboe for band and piano for the Glee Club.

You rec’d a bulletin from the U. of Buffalo on Postgraduates Course for Practitioners – Sept. 24 & 29. You also rec’d some adv. from Cole Chem. Co. on Derfule, etc., etc. Those companies are not going to miss an opportunity if they can help it. Seems good tho, to get things thru the mail for Dr. Y.

Love Mother

August 31, 1945, p. 3

August 31, 1945, p. 3

I’ll finish my letter on this. Yours of Aug. 29 came today. We heard some good news this afternoon. Adm. Denfeld – head of demobilizing the Navy talked on a program. He said 11,000 officers would be released in Sept. – I wonder if you will be in the first group??? At any rate so many more will be released

August 31, 1945, p. 4

August 31, 1945, p. 4

each month – the number to be increased every month and by Navy Day in Oct. a huge figure. 24,000 is the goal for Dec. Those are some of the figures I caught. Maybe you heard that broadcast too. It’s logical to assume that as the force is decreased the Drs. will be too. Had a letter from Ruthie Y. They haven’t gotten their apt. yet, but living in a room at

August 31, 1945, p. 5

August 31, 1945, p. 5

the Methodist minister’s home. She went to Dr. Kizer for a check-up. He said not so much any one thing as a number of things – low blood count – low blood pressure. He is giving her medicine and she is to rest every day. Her chest hurt so they made an Xray

August 31, 1945, p. 6

August 31, 1945, p. 6

but everything was OK. I think she must have the chest pain like I had from a run down condition. I have to go with Mrs. Wood to the church at 4 and it’s 3:45 now. Here’s hoping for your early return

Love Mother

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/04/30/demobilizing-the-navy-gladys/

Cokes Would Be In Order (Gladys)

June 4, 1944 envelope

June 4, 1944 envelope

Letter transcription:

June 4, 1944, p. 1

June 4, 1944, p. 1

Kentland Ind.
June 4 – 1944

Dear Daddy –

Will start a letter this evening and maybe I’ll have something to add tomorrow – Howard & Ursula came to see me this afternoon. Helen is home and is going to come over and see me. She lived in Kansas City, Mo., 10 yrs. If she comes tomorrow I’ll tell you anything that might be of help to us. Howard asked me if we would rent our house. I told them our little attempt with Smiths – They agreed with me our house is well worth $45.00 – said they were getting $40.00 for theirs in the country. Mrs. W. said she thought our house should be worth $50.00 – The new

June 4, 1944, p. 2

June 4, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] Ag teacher is looking for a place & Mrs. Z. asked me if we were considering renting. I told her I didn’t know yet – we would have to see about “Mo.” first.

Arlene came up and Lucile brought Jimmy so we really had “open yard” this afternoon. Mark got the idea cokes would be in order so he & Virginia loaded up some bottles and went to the Station and bought cokes with his money – without consulting me. I had the same idea so was glad he had acted before I told him to. Jimmy Ed & David both got a share of their mother’s cokes – Jimmy is a veteran coke drinker but David seems to like the stuff pretty well too – Arlene has a new girl – one that seems to be the answer to all her desires for a helper – She even lives there and so Arlene has a little more time off.

June 4, 1944, p. 3

June 4, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] When Arlene loaned us the “Thum” bottle, she decided to pour a little out in something in case she might want to dab a little on Donnie “in case” – The only thing she saw at the time was a “shot glass” so poured some in it. She told Bill what she had done and he told everyone she was trying to break him by putting “Thum” in his glass. I am certain that would break anybody of anything – after getting the tiny bit in my eye.

I wrote to Ruth M. today. You should drop your folks a line now and let them know you are in your new location. As soon as I get news from you of a house I’ll call for train reservations.

Love Mother

June 4, 1944, p. 4

June 4, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] Monday afternoon –
So far I haven’t talked to Helen. I saw Coke this morning and strange as it may seem they haven’t any K.C. connections. I thought perhaps they would know someone there.

I cleaned half the basement this morning – Try to finish the other this evening. David got an ink bottle this morning and spilled ink from davenport to kitchen so J. & M. cleaned living room & dining room floors – however it needed to be done. The house looks like the one at Lake Forest – I have rugs all over the place to catch the black marks –

Hoping to see you soon –
Love Mother

David, Jimmy Ed Johnson & Donald Funk, dated June 4, 1944

David, Jimmy Ed Johnson & Donald Funk, dated June 4, 1944

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/02/21/cokes-would-be-in-order-gladys/

Walk to Town (Gladys)

April 19 & 20, 1944 envelope

April 19 & 20, 1944 envelope

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 1

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

Kentland Ind.
4-19-44

Dear Daddy –

I wrote one letter this morning but thought I would start one this afternoon while I was thinking about what I wanted to write.

I took David out for a walk and he kept going until we were on Main street so I got the paper & a few articles I needed at the drug store. I saw Coke and she wanted to know about when you would be home. Said they wanted to see you, etc. I asked her about Dr. Baer and he is a MacIntyre. They live in a town close to Great Lakes, but it isn’t Lake Forest. She told me the name but I don’t remember. Maybe it was Highland Park. I am not sure. At any rate coke wants you to see Dr. B. He is a Commander now. I saw Alma and she said the evening we tried to call them was the only evening they were away from home, and on Wed. evening

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 2

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] before you went to G.L. they didn’t go to the show, but were downtown. We just didn’t see them.

I stopped to see Mrs. Krull and she says the suits wouldn’t make over for John. Says she wouldn’t tackle the job and a tailor would charge $15.00 to do the job. I was wondering if Ralph or Clarence could use a suit or two. Mrs. K. just made one of Nick’s old suits over for Dorothy. I wish I had used one of yours for myself instead of buying the one I did. I still would like to have a black suit and could take the pin strip and have one made for myself.

I stopped at Johnsons and Jimmy had been sick. I saw someone sitting in the living room and opened the door and David ran in. Lucile came and said Jimmy had been sick but was feeling better and temp was normal. He was quite sick last night and had a temp of 104 4/10 (rectally). He had a convulsion last night

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 3

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] but seemed perfectly normal today. The Dr. thought he might be taking measles or something but evidently not or he would be breaking out. His throat was sore and the Dr. swabbed it. David was with him Sun. & Mon. afternoon and Lucile thinks he was starting a temp Mon. so if he has anything D. has a good chance of getting it from being with him Mon. Of course at the time Lucile didn’t know he had a temp, but we were in the restaurant together and before that she had Jimmy out here, and when she started home from the restaurant with Jimmy, said he got fussy and she had to carry him home. I hope he doesn’t develop anything. Are children who are subject to allergies more apt to have convulsions than others? The thought just occurred to me, because of Jimmy and the Wilson baby, Michael, was like Jimmy when he was small (covered with eczema) and he is subject to convulsions. Or is it due to the high temperatures?

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 4

April 19 & 20, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] Bobby came up with 25₵ and asked Mark to buy him a plane to build so Mark is at Funks now making Bobby a plane. John asked me if he should go to a party Sat. nite, since you were planning to come home he wasn’t sure it would be the thing to do, but I told him he could see you Sun. and I thought he should attend the party since he stays home most of the time.

It is 6 PM by the living room clock, so that means chow time for David. He should have a good appetite after walking to town and back. I thought maybe he had walked too much and John said, “Do you realize if he had been home he would be walking around here all the time?”

Thurs. a.m. – the mail hasn’t been delivered yet – I am finishing this for Mark to take as he goes to school. It is cloudy this morning and looks very much like it will rain anytime. I did have ideas of washing some but now have a good excuse not to.

Love Mother

P.S. Highland Park is right.

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/01/24/walk-to-town-gladys/

The Easter Candy (Gladys)

April 17, 1944 envelope

April 17, 1944 envelope

April 17, 1944, p. 1

April 17, 1944, p. 1

Letter transcription:

Kentland Ind.
4-17-44

Dear Daddy –

Yours mailed yesterday came this a.m. with the M.O.’s. I will go to the bank this afternoon and deposit the most of it. Will keep out a few dollars for daily use. I am so glad you are planning to come home Sat. Just hope nothing turns up to change your plans. It is sunny so far today but there are grey clouds hanging around and the weather forecast is for rain tonight. I hung out two washers of clothes. Took David out in the yard with me. Jimmy & Martha ran around and played with him and he had a good time. He is still having a time, but in his bed. I put him down just before J. & M. came home from school and he got too much attention when he shouldn’t have had any. He is tearing his bed up but will quiet down and go to sleep after John goes back to school. John is practicing now.

April 17, 1944, p. 2

April 17, 1944, p. 2

[page 2] Mark has gone back to school. He always has so much play to get done before the bell rings. John is keeping his report card so you can sign it before he takes it back.

I had a little experience with the Bendix. I was trying to push some soap thru that I had cut up on the grader. I pushed too hard, was using a blueing bottle for the pusher, and the metal screen pushed thru. It dropped to the drain and I got it out thru the little drawer at the bottom, where the drain is cleaned. I didn’t try to put it back in place. Thought I would save that job for you. However I hardly think you will have much time for things around here, since you won’t get home until Sat. nite.

I am wondering if you have done anything about the housing situation and if so what the results have been. I know you haven’t had much time yet.

April 17, 1944, p. 3

April 17, 1944, p. 3

[page 3] No mail today except your letter and Colliers. I can’t understand Jim’s silence. I suppose we will hear from him when he gets around to writing. I think I wrote to him about a week after you came home.

– – I resumed my duties such as washing dishes & clothes. Had a few of David’s things to do and didn’t want to do them by hand so gathered up enough others to put in the Bendix. It is all clear and sunny now. No dark clouds hanging around. I feel that way myself. That is what your letter did for me today. What a man.

Have you seen or heard anything about the neighbor’s brother-in-law? I would have thought he would be in the hospital where you are. So far as I know our neighbors are still vacationing in Fla. I suppose they will be coming back soon, now that the weather seems to be warming up. Hope it warms up for you so you can change uniforms. Purely mercenary thought.

April 17, 1944, p. 4

April 17, 1944, p. 4

[page 4] David finally went to sleep and is still snoozing. I would like to grab 40 winks myself before he gets awake.

You remember the Easter candy? I took it all out of the box and put it in a desk drawer – to keep the wolves away. I just left the box & empty papers on the sewing cabinet. J. & M. made several trips to the empty box (force of habit). Finally Mark said this box of candy was a gyp. I didn’t say anything. They never did find my hiding place. I knew if they did it would soon be gone – This way I can have a nibble once in a while – Now am I an old meanie?

Shall I send Vince’s wife a check or money order for $34? What shall I say about the money? I don’t believe we settled on that. This mail service is something, eh what? Write one day, you get it the next and vise versa. I’ll not write to Mrs. Stanich until I hear from you.

Love Mother

©2016 copyright owned and transcribed by Deborah Sweeney
Post originally found: https://genealogylady.net/2016/01/18/the-easter-candy-gladys/